“No volcanoes, no agriculture”

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Paramagnetism: Rediscovering Nature’s Secret Force of Growth, 1995

“No volcanoes, no agriculture — for volcanic ash and rock are the guts of good soil.”

Recently, I came across ‘paramagnetism’ in two ways. I was searching for “Satsuki Narasaki’, author of Three Electrostatic Laws, when I came across a Russian article in which the writer used charcoal in growing plants as is traditional in Japan. He referred to the work of Japanese physicist Narasaki as well as books by Philip S. Callahan on paramagnetism.

The following day, an e-mail newsletter about feng shui arrived. It was entitled, “Paramagnetism: war and peace.” Not only is paramagnetism a positive factor in growing healthy crops, it seems to be inversely correlated with war zones!

And so I ordered a copy of Callahan’s book, Paramagnetism: Rediscovering Nature’s Secret Force of Growth, 1995. With a doctorate in entymology, Callahan is a first-rate all-around scientist, in the mold of the natural historians of old. Knowledgeable about physics as easily as birds and insects, eager to improve agricultural yields, he presents a wealth of easy-to-read information on all these seemingly-unrelated fields related to paramagnetism.

The following excerpts may be of interest to Okunomichi’s readers.

p29 We may understand then that there are three ways to generate this valuable magnetic force called paramagnetism into the soil:

1.  By adding volcanic rock into the soil.

2.  By fiberization so that paramagnetic oxygen reaches the roots in soggy soil.

3.  By using weeds, which are green containers of paramagnetic minerals, in our compost or manure.

p36 In Japan one gets a feeling of restfulness in the wooden and thatch-roofed Shinto shrine of the sacred groves. I began to feel that if the vital force of rocky places made one feel energetic and the wooden shrines and trees of sacred groves made one feel relaxed, that there seemed to be two forces at work. One force was calming and restful, the other energizing and fatigue defeating. Perhaps in Eastern terms, the yin of the female and the yang of the male?

It was through reading the brilliant writings of the Irish genius John Tyndall that I finally realized that these vital forces were not magnetic … but the paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties of rocks and plants.

p37 Diamagnetism is a negative movement, or movement away from a magnetic field. Paramagnetism is a strong positive attraction to a magnet. Most organic molecules are diamagnetic and most volcanic rock and ash are paramagnetic.

p33 Forms which Westerners would consider inanimate have become fused with vitality through Shinto. Whereas we in the West would mould or break natural form to our design, the Japanese, recognizing vitality inherent in the form, shape, and design to release the vitality.   The Ocean in the Sand by Mark Holborn

p46 Most organic compounds, including all plants, are diamagnetic. If plants are diamagnetic and good growing soil paramagnetic, then we must be dealing with the yin and yang of Chinese and Japanese geomancy.

p47 By positioning such rocks in relationship to the sun and to each other, one can control plant growth. Apparently the ancients knew about this yin and yang, diamagnetic/paramagnetic phenomenon and utilized it in their Zen gardens.

Paramagnetism is associated with:

  • Volcanic rocks , granite, basalt 
  • Oxygen 
  • Yang 
  • Sacred sites

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