Narasaki’s Lines of Power for Agriculture

Narasaki Iyashirochi figure

Iyashirochi and agriculture

We have learned about Narasaki Kougetsu and the Katakamuna documents which he recorded. Now let us look at his technical work. Narasaki was an eletrical engineer working in the mountains of Hyogo-ken after the Second World War. His work involved electrical power lines with special interest in their effect on the growing of plants and crops. His field work included studying the terrain in the mountain range of Rokkosan. Narasaki found that the location of an iron foundry could be correlated to superior or inferior grades of iron produced there.

He found correlations of mountain peaks and valleys with lines of high and low life energies. Lines of high energy connect mountain peaks. These lines he called iyashirochi. Lines connecting valleys have low energy and he called them kegarechi. Kegare is a word denoting negative qualities.

It is difficult to translate iyashirochi. It is related to places of iyashi or iyasaka, which are positive nouns. Kobayashi Bigen Sensei recommends as a toast to abundance and happiness the ancient Iyasaka! rather than the current Kampai or the former Banzai.

Nevertheless, iyashirochi have high electrical potential. Iyashirochi are characterized by an abundance of negative ions which strengthen the body. Also the negative ions balance the positive ions and there is a natural flow of charges, more energy moving. As Alfred Watkins in England showed, ley lines are lines of power. Iyashirochi may be ley lines of similar power.

Dowsing
As is known, dowsing is a technique used to find deposits of water, ley lines, stone walls, and other underground objects. In Japan, a dowser using a branch of the hashibami hazelnut tree can feel certain changes when near such objects. The explanation is given by a physicist from Sorbonne: underground water affects the earth’s magnetic field. The magnetic field is felt by the dowser’s body, and the effect is magnified and made visible by movement of the branch.

A team of three scientists has connected dowsing to megaliths. John Taylor is a professor at Kings College in England. Eduardo Baronofsky is an Argentinian expert. Bill Louis is a dowser with technical experience. He can feel water under stone circles that is flowing to other stone monuments. He places his hands on megaliths and identifies points of circling, spiraling energy. He measures those places and finds that they have twice the magnetic field strength. From these experiments, we may conclude that megaliths do contain significant energy, in the form of magnetic energy.

Scientists and dowsers report that menhirs, dolmens, and other megalithic works have been placed at points of high energy. Generally these are places where ley lines cross. It can also be noted that in Australia, Aborigines hold ceremonies at power points characterized by megaliths and pictures of snakes. Snakes and their brethren, dragons, often represent these ley lines.

Ed. note:  Illustration and information from Narasaki’s book, Three Electrostatic Laws, see earlier post. Some of the information in this post comes from Akiyoneto, Nazo no Katakamuna Bunmei, Mystery of Katakamuna Civilization, 1981, and Narasaki’s book, Three Electrostatic Laws. See earlier posts. If you use the search box for keywords such as Katakamuna, Narasaki, etc., you will find many other related posts.

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