Lahaina Noon Update:  Kau ka la i ka lolo

lahaina-noon-img_1278

Our earlier post on Lahaiana Noon , https://okunomichi.wordpress.com/2016/05/07/1711/has been visited by many. This post is about Kau ka la ia ka lolo, the traditional term for the passage kau of the sun at the zenith over one’s head.

At the Windward Community College in Kaneohe, Hawaii, is a Polynesian voyaging display on permanent view. It is highly recommended for those interested in how the Polynesian people journeyed over vast distances with great navigational skill. You can view a scale model of the  Hōkūleʻa voyaging canoe and an introduction to Hawaiian astronomy. We thank Professor Joseph Ciotti for preparation of the exhibit and explaining it to us. Dr. Ciotti remarked that it was the eminent Hawaiian historian, Rubellite Kawena Johnson who provided him with the proper term for this celestial event. 

We show a photo we took of the Kau ka la ia ka lolo exhibit. The text reads as follows:

Twice a year the noontime sun passes directly overhead. Kau ka la ia ka lolo was believed to be a time of great mana. At this moment a person’s shadow (aka) disappeared and was thought to enter his sacred head. The two dates for these solar zenith passages are marked on the map for different places on O’ahu.

*