Category Archives: Cosmology

Kototama and “Now” — An Izumo Taisha Shinto Perspective

Izumo Taisha

KOTOTAMA

Okunomichi and WoshiteWorld are deeply interested in the study and practice of Kototama. This is another in the Kototama series of expository articles. Here, we share a Shinto view of Kototama. We received the statements below from a representative of Izumo Taisha Grand Shrine. 

Introduction

Izumo Taisha (Izumo Ōyashiro) is one of the oldest and largest Shinto shrines in Japan. The taisha enshrines Ōkuninushi no Ōkami, kami of earth and spiritual world.

Shinto is the native Japanese religion which is based on traditional nature worship and animism. It does not have a particular founder, doctrine, or scripture. This is similar to old Hawaiian and Native American religions.

Nakaima, The “Now”

The word Nakaima comes from a national history book, Shoku Nihongi, Sequel to Chronicle of Japan, 797 CE [sequel to Nihon Shoki, 720 CE]. Nakaima is made up of two words, naka and ima, where the former means middle and the latter means now, the present time.

As Shinto does not have concepts about heaven and hell in the hereafter, “this world” is considered the most valuable and important time for all lives. It is the “middle” between the past and the future. “Now” is the precious time to reflect the past and expect the future.

Kototama of Norito

Shinto prayers, norito, are based on Kototama, the worship to words and language itself. From ancient times, it is said that, “The words can move the heaven and the earth” especially in the Japanese poems (waka, tanka). Traditionally, people use and choose words very carefully when they compose the poems because of Kototama, especially yamato kotoba (ancient Japanese classical words). This is why norito is composed only from yamato kotoba. When the words are pronounced, Kototama is involved — with its vibration toward the world.

Kototama and Nakaima

In Shinto cosmology, Kototama is the basic tool to affect Nakaima.  

Experience Kototama and Nakaima

To experience Kototama in Nakaima, recite Ōharae no Kotoba, the prayer for Great Purification, one of the most famous norito. 

HARAE NO KOTOBA, PRAYER FOR PURIFICATION AND BLESSING

The Harae no Kotoba below is an invocation often recited at Izumo Taisha asking Ōkuninushi no Ōkami, and all the myriads of Kami to join in the ceremony. There are three basic types of harae purification and blessing:

  • the body (to maintain health and well-being, to heal or avoid illness;
  • the soul or spirit of the living and the dead;
  • our surroundings and natural environment.

The last three lines can be recited as a short prayer for purification and blessing.

Harae no Kotoba

kakemaku mo kashikoki Izanagi no Ōkami

Tsukushi no Himuka no Tachibana no Odo no

Ahagihara ni misogi harai tamaishi toki ni

narimaseru haraido no Ōkami tachi

kamunagaranaru Ōmichi no naka ni umarete

arinagara sono mikage woshi fukaku omowazute

sumekamitachi no mimegumi wo oroka ni omi

tarishitoki ni ayamachi okaseru wa saranari

ima mo tsumi-kegare aramu woba harai tamai

kiyome tamae to mousu kotowo yaoyorozu no

kamitachi tomoni kikoshimese to

kashikomi kashikomi mo mousu



harai tamai kiyome tamae

harai tamai kiyome tamae

harai tamai kiyome tamae

References

Izumo Taisha, Izumo Ōyashiro, website:  http://www.izumooyashiro.or.jp/’

Izumo Taisha: https://yamanomiya.wordpress.com/2015/06/22/eleven-shrines-in-izumo-izumo-taisha/

Norito and Oharae:  [https://japanshrinestemples.blogspot.com/2015/09/norito-incantations.html]

Kototama on Okunomichi and WoshiteWorld: Type the word “Kototama” in the Search box.

This post also appears on WoshiteWorld.

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Kimi no Na Wa and Musubi

kumihimo musubi S

Preface

Kimi no Na Wa is an extremely popular and powerful anime movie directed by Makoto Shinkai. We say “powerful” in that it is thought-provoking of matters outside the ordinary limits of time and space.

Musubi.  Kumihimo is a Japanese braiding method for making decorative and functional cords, and it is depicted in several scenes in the movie. Musubi is a knot, a tying together, of connecting people and things. The photo shows two kumihimo cords in a musubi knot.

Motohisa Yamakage has taught Koshinto through books such as The Essence of Shinto. Yamakage Sensei writes, “Musubi means to unite or bind together. … the concept of musubi signifies the proliferation of life and spirit. … the very process of creating and giving birth to life and spirit is described as musubi and we [Koshinto] place it in very high regard.”

Time and Space.  We have related the Tanabata Festival tale as the weaving of time and space. This is an observance since early Jomon times that takes place in the seventh night of the seventh lunar month, when the moon is only half-full and the stars in the Milky Way can clearly be seen. The word tanabata means a kind of weaving loom. So picture a fabric being woven with threads of warp and woof. The threads of the warp represent the flow of time, and the shuttling of the woof creates space.

Kimi no Na wa (君の名は) is an international hit movie, entitled Your Name in English. The warping and entangling of time and space is the theme of this metaphysical movie. Perhaps that’s why millions of people find the movie so intriguing.

In today’s essay, we consider how the movie conveys the message of Musubi through the imagery of braiding.

Early on in the movie, we see that Mitsuha lives with her sister and grandmother in a very small town in the rural land of Hida. Grandmother is priestess of an old shrine which has as its goshintai sacred object a megalith in the center of a meteor crater. Mitsuha serves as miko-san shrine maiden and performs a ritual at the shrine. Grandmother is also teaching Mitsuha to braid cords in the style of kumihimo. What, we wonder, is the significance of these elements?

Musubi in Kimi no Na wa

Grandmother’s explanation of Musubi uses the imagery of kumihimo. In one scene, Mitsuha and her sister are going with their grandmother on a pilgrimage to the sacred place of the megalith. On the way, Grandmother is explaining Musubi. We have restored the original word, kami, to the subtitles.

Musubi is the old way of calling the local guardian kami.

Tying thread is Musubi. Connecting people is Musubi.

These are all the kami’s power.

So the braided cords that we make are the kami’s art and represent the flow of time itself.

They converge and take shape. They twist, tangle, sometimes unravel, break, then connect again.

Musubi-knotting. That’s time.

Musubi

From the above, we can see that the concept of musubi is that of gathering and connecting. Grandmother has explained how people are connected in time and space, and she stresses the time element. This is the basic theme of the movie.

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The Super-Science of Katakamuna, by K. Fukano – 2.

KATAKAMUNA 3 centers

We continue reporting on the book by physicist K. Fukano. He has studied the 80 verses of the Katakamuna scrolls as presented by Narasaki, and has interpreted them according to his own knowledge of physics. Katakamuna verses are written in the style of waka, i.e., in rhythm of five and seven, five and seven, etc. They are written in spiral fashion beginning in the middle. In the center is a circular symbol, one of the three shown here. The most coKATAKAMUNA verses 5 & 6mmon circle is the Yatanokakami symbol, the one on top which occurs in 71 out of 80 verses. The next is called Futomani which appears in 7, and the bottom circle is the Mikumari, in 2 verses.

These two spirals are Verses 5 and 6 of the Katakamuna scrolls. Together they are the most important. Verse 5 has 24 characters. Verse 6 has 24+5 characters, the last five being “Ka ta ka mu na,” which may be taken to be the title of this work, and will be omitted from the analysis.

Together, these two verses have 48 syllables/characters. All of the Katakamuna characters appear once and only once in these two verses. The spiraling characters have been put into the form of a table, as shown at bottom. This chart comes from Narasaki’s “orange booklet,” Ultra-Ancient Civilization of Japan, which we reported on earlier. By studying the chart, we can figure out how the character syllabary was organized and formed.

Before going on, we’d like to give this excerpt from the earlier post. We wrote:

Narasaki learned from the scrolls that spinning and orbiting are the basic nature of time and space. Because of the spinning and orbiting motions, there is a center of motion and the  energy is equal in all directions. This wave movement makes magnetic and electrical energy. This affects mountains, the environment, humans, and plants.

Character Order of Katakamuna

The organization of the Katakamuna syllabary of characters is not by a, i, u, e, o, although those are indeed the five vowels. Let us read Verse 5:

hi hu mi yo i     ma wa ri te me ku ru

mu na ya ko to     a u no su he si re

Verse 5

Verse 5

Now, look at the two sequences of five characters:  hi fu mi yo i      mu na ya ko to. These are the numbers from one to ten!

HI FU MI.002

Next, examine the small circle going around the larger circle. Starting from the “east” position, the circle moves counter-clockwise from hi (1) through ya (8), and there is a double small circle for ko (9), and finally no circle at all for to (10). Already, we see that the character sequence describes movement in space and time. It may represent the sun’s cycle as seen from earth, from sunrise to the next sunrise. We have learned in Part 1 that the small circle is called Mari and the large circle is Ma.

You can study Verse 6 in the same way.

ka ta ti sa ki     so ra ni mo ro ke se

yu ye nu o wo     ha e tu yi ne ho n*

Note: possibly “n” was originally pronounced “wu.” See Part 3.

Verse 6

Verse 6

The characters may be grouped according to their similarities. The seven characters, ma wa ri te me ku ru,  do seem to be related, don’t they? And so for the second set of seven, a u no su he si re. We can group the characters in this fashion all the way to the end.

Yatanokakami

Yatanokakami and 48 characters

48 in Yatanokakami

The chart above has grouped the 48 characters into similar patterns. The illustration makes a point: all 48 symbols come from the Yatanokakami symbol. The circular symbol with eight small circles in the center of Verses 5 and 6 and the vast majority of the verses is called Yatanokakami. What is it, and what does it mean? Let us break this long word down into its constituent parts. Ka can mean root, and it can stand for chikara, power. Mi is essence (e.g., fruit). Therefore, kami is the essence of the root or essence of the power.

What is kakami? We usually think that a kagami is a mirror. In this case, using the two meanings of ka, we have: the essence of the root of the power.

What is yatanoYa is eight in traditional Japanese. Yatano means fully saturated. It is equivalent to eight electrons fully saturating the orbit around the nucleus of an atom.

Finally, Yatanokakami means the fully saturated essence of the root of the power. That is represented by the symbol of the Ma circle and its eight Mari circles. In other words, it is the cosmology of Ama, Universe. And Katakamuna is the root of Universe.

Table of Verses 5 and 6

Verses 5-6

Comments

In the above poems, we have used original syllable pronunciations, not the more recent Chinese sounds. The four Sino-Japanese sounds are chi (originally ti), tsu (tu), shi (si) and fu (hu).

You may have noted a lack of dakuon voiced consonants. Ancient languages followed the Kototama principle and avoided dakuon because it darkens vocal energy. Examples of voiced (unvoiced) syllables: da (ta),  zu (su), bi (hi). See also other posts with keyword “Kototama” by Okunomichi and by WoshiteWorld.wordpress.com.

Revised 2017.04.14

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Lao Tsu Lines

HHN blue sky

The following one-liners were inspired by Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English, Tao Te Ching, 1972c. The book is beautifully calligraphed and illustrated with English’s black-and-white nature photographs. The numbers in parentheses are the chapter numbers from the Tao Te Ching.

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The Tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao.   (1)

The Tao is an empty vessel; it is used, but never filled.   (4)

2015-05-110The highest good is like water.   (8)

Returning to the source is stillness, which is the way of nature.   (16)

The way of nature is unchanging.   (16)

Yield and overcome; bend and be straight; empty and be full.   (22)     DSCN2581

The Tao is forever undefined.   (32)

To die but not to perish is to be eternally present.   (33)

It does not show greatness, and is therefore truly great.   (34)

Tao abides in non-action, yet nothing is left undone.   (37)

Being is born of non-being.   (40)

2014-07-16 11.13.23

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David Bohm:  Wholeness and the Nature of Reality 

The question of whether the world we live in is a simulation of some other has recently been raised in the media. For those of our readers who, too, are pondering the nature of reality — and we think that includes most of you — we recommend the study of David Bohm’s work.

Dialogues with Scientists and Sages

imgres-3We first learned about David Bohm in the book by Renee Weber, Dialogues with Scientists and Sages: The Search for Unity, Routledge, 1986. Philosopher Weber interviewed a number of exemplary people of our time: Lama Govinda, Rupert Sheldrake, David Bohm, The Fourteenth Dalai Lama, Father Bede Griffiths, Ilya Prigogine, Stephen Hawking, and Krishnamurti. This book can be truly transformative and although out of print, should be on our bookshelves to be read and reread. Bohm himself was greatly affected by the Eastern views of Krishnamurti.

David Bohm

220px-David_Bohm

David Bohm, 1917-1992, was a prominent quantum theoretical physicist who had studied and worked with Einstein and Oppenheimer. He made a number of important contributions to quantum mechanics, relativity, plasma theory, and ontology theory. Ontology is the branch of metaphysics and philosophy that is concerned with the nature of reality. His work challenged conventional physical thought and offered an innovative approach, so innovative as to be little understood nor accepted by the mainstream. His work, unfortunately unappreciated until now, will surely become more widely known in this century.

Wholeness and the Implicate Order

imgresDavid Bohm was an extraordinary physicist whose great work, Wholeness and the Implicate Order, was published by Routledge in 1980. In the Introduction of this book, he wrote:

  • “I would say that in my scientific and philosophical work, my main concern has been with understanding the nature of reality in general and of consciousness in particular as a coherent whole, which is an unending process of movement and unfoldment.”
  • “How are we to think coherently of a simple, unbroken, flowing actuality of existence as a whole, containing both thought (consciousness) and external reality as we experience it?
  • “Clearly, this brings us to consider our overall world view, which includes our general notions concerning the nature of reality along with those concerning the total order of the universe, i.e., cosmology.”
  • “My suggestion is that a proper world view, appropriate for its time, is generally one of the basic factors that is essential for harmony in the individua and in society as a whole.”

Topics in his book include the following:

  • Ch. 1 Wholeness as a world view compared with fragmentation world view.
  • Ch. 2 Language can be noun-based or verb-based, divisive or unitive.
  • Ch. 3 Reality as an underlying universal movement/process; world view in which consciousness and reality are not fragmented from each other.
  • Ch. 4, 5, 6 Technical subjects
  • Ch. 7 Consciousness and the enfolding-unfolding universe

There is an important Appendix at the end of Chapter 1 on the Western and Eastern forms of insight into wholeness. Here, he notes that in the East, the immeasurable was seen as the primary reality, for measure is a thought of man. “When measure is identified with the very essence of reality, this is illusion.” It is the immeasurable that Bohm calls the implicate order.

What the West can do, Bohm states, is to

  • “develop new insight into fragmentation and wholeness [that] requires a creative work even more difficult than that needed to make fundamental new discoveries in science, or great and original works of art.”
  • “assimilate [the great wisdom from the whole of the past, both in the East and in the West] and to go on to new and original perception relevant to our present condition of life.”

In the rest of the book, Bohm lays out the results of his own creative work. We, now, can take up the reins and move ahead into greater wholeness and harmony in our world view and in our lives. This is one of the great books of the twentieth century.

David Bohm and F. David Peat:  Science, Order, and Creativityimgres-2

This book was published in 1987. It is a more descriptive book and may be easier to understand. It takes up topics such as creativity in science, what is order?, the implicate order, consciousness, and creativity in the whole of life. Certainly well worth reading.

D. Bohm and B.J. Hiley, The Undivided Universe: An ontological interpretation of quantum theory

imgres-1The Undivided Universe by Bohm and his long-time collaborator was published in 1993, a year after Bohm’s passing. This epitome of Bohm’s work elucidates the implicate order and its role in quantum theory, as well as in consciousness.

  • “As we develop this idea, we shall see that the notion of enfoldment is not merely a metaphor, but that it has to be taken fairly literally. To emphasise this point, we shall therefore say that the order in the hologram is implicate. The order in the object, as well as in the image, will then be unfolded and we shall call it explicate. The process, in this case wave movement, in which this order is conveyed from the object to the hologram will be called enfoldment or implication. The process in which the order in the hologram becomes manifest to the viewer in an image will be called unfoldment or explication.”
  • “What all this suggests is that our most primary experience in consciousness actually is of an implicate order. And our perception of the explicate order is constituted mostly by a series of abstractions from this.”
  • “The implicate order is not only the ground of perception, but also of the actual process of thought.”
  • “All of this is clearly compatible with the notion that the basic order of the mind is implicate and that the explicate arises as a particular case of this implicate order in much the way that we have suggested.”

Links

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Katakamuna and Ultra-Ancient Civilization of Japan by Narasaki Satsuki

Booklet

Okunomichi presents a brief summary of the contents of an updated booklet on the Ashiya Civilization of Katakamuna by its discoverer, Narasaki Satsuki. The booklet is Ultra-Ancient Civilization of Japan, 30pp, 2007.  See details below and on http://www.narasaki-inst.com/katakamuna.htm.

book13

「日本の上古代文化」 内容   Ultra-Ancient Civilization of Japan, title

楢崎皐月.  Narasaki Satsuki, author.   久保田 覚巳.  Kubota Satoshimi, editor


アシヤ文化研究会.  Ashiya Bunka Kenkyukai, Ashiya Cultural Research Association

Narasaki unlocked the Kojiki and found the ancient secret of Katakamuna: iyashiro no michi, kannagara no michi. With the intuitive intelligence of ancient people, they understood the law of nature and attained a high level of physics and philosophy.

Narasaki’s family kept the original copy of this book, published it undated, around showa 40 = 1965. It was edited and republished in 2007. It also contains at the end 声音記号と片仮名文字の対照表, a sheet of vocal symbols and katakana characters (as a foldout page).

Narasaki has also written a book, 「静電三法」Seiden Sampo, Three Laws of Static Electricity. It is intended by the Ashiya Bunka Kenkyukai to keep education correct. They hope that this booklet will be useful to those researching 「カタカムナ文献」Katakamuna Documents and 「日本の古代史」Ultra-ancient History of Nihon.

Our summary of the contents

(1)ゆがめられた日本歴史.  Distorted history of Japan

An ancient civilization called Ashiya existed in ultra ancient Nihon. Then the Yamato people became dominant and Chinese culture was imported. The Kojiki contains evidence of Ashiya, and physicist Narasaki has unlocked its secret.

After World War II, history prior to the third century was wiped out, including that of Emperors Jimmu (ascended throne 660 BCE) and Ojin. These emperors are now considered legendary although they were actually historical.

This booklet is based on Narasaki’s lectures on the discovery of the true culture of ancient Nihon.

(2)上古代史の混迷.  Confusion of ultra-ancient history

After the second world war, education in Japan was changed due to the influence of the United States on Japanese nationalism. The true history was lost, and in middle school these days, no one knows about Jimmu Tenno. The country that was called Yamatai by the Chinese may have actually been called Yamato by the people.

Mori Kiyohito (author of Kōkoku shidō-ron, 1939) believed that Himiko was Hime-mikoto (venerated princess), and she was Empress Jingū (169-269 CE). For 120 years between Jingū and her son Ojin (270-310 CE), no Tenno is named. Why? After Jingū’s death, a male ruler was not able to maintain peace, and a 13-year-old female was chosen. 

Historians say that Yamato began after Himiko, but this is mistaken. Narasaki believes that Yamato began earlier, around 600-700 BCE, the time of Jimmu, and about 500 years later Jingu who was known as Himiko reigned in Kyushu.

Around 300 CE Japan had an imperial house in the land of Mimana (now part of Korea). At that time Japan was more powerful than Silla or Kudara because it had higher technology.

(3)日本の上古代に高度文化があつた.  Advanced culture of ultra-ancient Japan

An old book of China of about 1200 BCE writes that the highly intelligent Japanese presented herbs to China. The first emperor, Emperor Qin Shi Huang, of China sent General Jofuku to Japan to find the elixer of immortality. [Jofuku (in Japanese) is Xu Fu (Hsu Fu) who was born in 255 BCE in Qi, an ancient Chinese state, and served as a court sorcerer in Qin Dynasty China. He was sent by Qin Shi Huang to the eastern seas twice to look for the elixir of life. His two journeys occurred between 219 BCE and 210 BCE. After the second, he may have remained in the islands of Japan until his death, for he never returned. ]

During the later half of Kamiyo (Kamiyo-no-kohanki), between the Stone Age and the Iron Age, the Japanese made weapons stronger than those found in China, and they had better ships. Nihon Shoki says that Sujin Tenno (97–30 BCE) in his 17th year ordered his country to build ships. In Ojin Tenno’s times (270–310 CE), ships made in Izu no Kuni measured 17 ken (~50 ft), where 1 ken =~ 3 ft. The London Museum has an Japanese iron mirror that does not rust (like the non-rusting iron of Ashiya).

There were many kinds of kamiyo moji in the kamiyo and chokodai periods, but regretfully, evidence that they were actually being used is lacking.

Kojiki Questions

The Kojiki was written in kanji and the project began under Temmu Tenno. However, it was not until 712 that the Kojiki was completed by another editor in the imperial court, Ō no Yasumaro, and presented to Empress Gemmei (707–15). Hida no Are dictated the contents; he could remember everything that he had read or heard. He was 28 years old at the time, and he was reading kodai moji, ancient scripts. What were the moji? What were the documents?

Shinwa no naiou, inner depths of myths. Kojiki myths are goofy stories. Why? Narasaki suspected that they contained hidden messages which he strove to uncover.

Ogasawara Koji, sensei of Kototama study, wrote an article in an October Showa 38 = 1963 magazine, Kougaku. Called The Study of the Imperial House, the paper stated that the base of Kototama Futomani is seishin gensho, the interior of a person (such as intelligence, emotions, spiritual nature). Just as living things are made of cells, atoms, electrons, the universe is also made up of parts. The Spirit of the universe is Izanagi, while the Object (physical things) of the universe is Izanami.

Subete no gensho, everything that exists comes from Spirit and Object which are connected with Musubi (a deep philosophical concept).  Even if science is now highly developed, without shidou, the spiritual way of kami, human society will not be able to function well. Then Kototama Futomani with its highly developed science will save society. Kojiki is the manual of how to use Kototama Futomani.

* Mikusa no Kantakara Three Sacred Treasures were put away in three separate places so that the wisdom would be hidden until it was time to save humanity. All names of Tenno have Futomani meanings. The stories of Kojiki are metaphorical. The secret will be unlocked by the right person at the right time.

* The Kojiki is yogensho, prophecy. The mystery of the Iwato Hiraki myth of opening the cave door is a prophecy. Who will unlock the door and unveil the secret?

(4)古事記に秘められた謎.  The mystery that has been hidden in the Kojiki

Manchuria

Narasaki as engineer-physicist was fortuitously assigned to Manchuria. There, he visited a Taoist monk several times. He had a translator the first time, and he became very interested and went back a couple more times by himself, communicating in written kanji. Narasaki asked the monk to teach him, since he regarded China as teacher to Japan. The Taoist said no, because Japan had a higher culture than China, some of which came to China. He learned that all theories can be understood through the JapaneseYata no kagami. The Taoist monk said that Yata-kana (the kana of Yata-kagami moji) is arranged in a special order. The same sounds can have different meanings, and Yata-kana is a method of systematic changes.

After the war, when Narasaki was working in the mountains of Rokkosan, the mountain man Hiratoji brought scrolls containing strange moji. Narasaki suddenly realized that this is Yata-kana, Yata-kami-na, writing of the kami of Yata, which he had heard about in Manchuria. He set about copying the writing and then interpreting them.

Ogasawara has said that the names of kami in Kojiki are all Futomani, i.e., kami-no-na is Futomani. The term Katakamuna comes from kata-kami-no-na.

* The Taoist monk said that moji were created by kami.

The Manchurian story above is the first key. Hiratoji and Rokkosan is the second key.

Rokkosan Mountains (Kobe)

Hiratoji was not a hunter, as some believe. He was a shugenja, a mountain ascetic. This seems to make more sense, in view of the understanding we now have of the contents of the scrolls. The Katakamuna moji of ancient Japanese people are primarily symbols of mathematics and physics. Katakamuna is connected with Kojiki through the magatama curved jewel, which represents movement in the physics of nature. Iyashiro no michi is kannagara, how we should live, the Way.

After reading Narasaki’s story, the booklet editor thought of how dark the world became when the iwato cave door was closed, like it is now. But the cave door will open. The knowledge of the kami will emerge as Light.

Physics of Katakamuna

In the scrolls, there are 29 sounds, 360 kami, in 48 moji symbols (for the syllables of the language).

Narasaki learned from the scrolls that spinning and orbiting are the basic nature of time and space. Because of the spinning and orbiting motions, there is a center of motion and the  energy is equal in all directions. This wave movement makes magnetic and electrical energy. This affects mountains, the environment, humans, and plants.

Ma is the essence of time and space. In Katakamuna moji, this is represented by the larger circle. Mari is the small circle in the moji. Mari have four properties: spinning, orbiting, positive, negative. For example, spinning of earth gives day and night; orbiting or revolving gives seasons of the year. Mari means mawari, circulating. The illustration shown is an example of Katakamuna moji from the booklet. See also http://avery.morrow.name/chokodai/. Note the large circle of Ma, and the small circle of Mari that goes around.

Ancient people could feel the honshitsu essence of time and space in the shape of a sphere with the four properties named above. They could feel it instinctively by living in nature.

Shizen housoku, Laws of nature. (p 23 in the booklet). Sadamari is the law of nature of the ancient Japanese. Mikusa no kantakara (Three Divine Treasures) and jinja no torii (torii of shrines) have the same meanings. ( p24).

Ryoushi  [量子, quantum] is a quantum of time and space and it has the four possible states from the two options each of the two properties named above:

(a) positive spin, positive revolution; (b) positive spin, negative revolution;

(c) negative spin, negative revolution; (d) negative spin, positive revolution.

It seems to us that Katakamuna’s positive and negative spins may be spins up or down, i.e., in opposite directions, as in modern physics. There are two sides of Ma, the essence of time and space: the objective world, and the back of the objective world [like spins up and down].

The word Soujisho  相似象学, also the name of Narasaki’s
Katakamuna magazine, was created by Narasaki, and it refers to the similarities of opposite things. This reminds us of a mirror’s reflection which is similar and yet opposite.

In conclusion, we are amazed to find such knowledge of advanced physics possessed by an ancient civilization.

Revised 2016.07.30

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Kototama of Takenouchi and Hotsuma Civilizations

Takenouchi and The Three Civilizations

There are various koshi-koden, secret documents from ancient Japan. They have been kept secret both by hostile repression and for safekeeping of wisdom. The Takenouchi records were compiled over a vast period of time; they were preserved by the Takenouchi family until these modern times. The Hotsuma Tsutae is a later record of a time of legendary figures which gives an insight to changes in human society. According to the Takenouchi Monjo, people lived spiritually in peace and plenty for a long period of time. However, new generations grew restive; they wanted more materiality and physicality. The guiding elders discussed this seriously and eventually made the decision to let humanity undergo a period of exploration of the material world. The sages would cooperate so that this painful period would be as brief as possible.

Thus the First Civilization gradually ended and the Second began. The decision for the transition was made about ten thousand years ago. Wisdom keepers began to hide their teachings by concealing documents, by creating and spreading myths that veiled the true nature of the stories, and by building religions that would impart some and only some of the truth. Although veiled, precious wisdom would need to be accessible when the time came for it to be revealed and applied.

When we think of how much humans have accomplished even in the last two thousand years in analyzing and controlling the physical world through technology development, building of nations, formalizing religions and other social systems, we are not amazed to realize that this material civilization has just about culminated.

The Second Civilization is nearing its end. In the Takenouchi Documents, transition dates of 2011 and 2017 are given. The Third Civilization of higher consciousness and greater unity is coming. This is the age all ancient wisdom cultures have been awaiting.

Those who are on the Path of Wisdom see signs of returning spring. As the physical world of nature and man grows more disruptive, at the same time more people are awakening to walk the Path. The world is emerging from the bleakness of winter into the rebirth of spring.

Kototama

The Path of the ancient ones of the Japanese Islands is called Kototama. This term refers to the spiritual (tama) power of sound (koto). Its formal name is Kototama Futomani, Kototama Great (futo) Mana (energy). Kototama Futomani is a cosmology and a practice. It is based on the fundamental property of Universe to create, to manifest, by vibrations. Vibrations produced by the human voice form the sounds of speech. We often forget that these vibrations of speech carry great spiritual energy. Kototama is based on the principle that the way sound patterns are organized determines the development of individual human consciousness and of human society. Civilizations evolve and fall on the basis of these sound systems.

Most important of the sounds are the vowels, aptly called mother sounds. In Kototama, we teach the sounds rather than the letter names. The sequence of the vowels plays a key role and describes the process of human and societal development. Consonants are father sounds and together they create child sounds.

In the coming Third Civilization, the vowel order of Futonorito will be:

          Ah  Ih  Eh  Oh  Uh

You will see some authors write vowel sounds as A I E O U. This is only a shorthand that represents sounds. In our current Second Civilization, the order of Kanagi is:

          Ah  Ih  Uh  Eh  Oh

The past First Civilization used the Sugaso order:

          Ah  Oh  Uh  Eh  Ih

Kototama science is deep and complex. We can only give the tip of the iceberg. The power of the vowels can be briefly and inadequately presented in the following.

          Ah           Spark beginning activity

          Ih            Will, intention, desire

          Eh           Judgment, discernment, evaluation

          Oh          Memory, experience

          Uh          Senses, materiality

Do not be misled by words. It takes practice to understand the subtle workings of these vowels. Individual sounds cannot be understood in isolation, for they always interact with other sounds. By working with these hints, we can begin to get an idea of the three civilizations.

Hotsuma Tsutae

Hotsuma Tsutae is another Koshi-koden. It is a legacy written in a beautiful script called Woshite. It was recorded two to three thousand years ago. It relates history and teachings of advanced humans thousands of years prior. We can well wonder how to fit the Hotsuma Tsutae into the overall scheme of the Takenouchi.

The main characters of the Hotsuma legends are known to readers of the conventionally accepted books: Kojiki (711 CE) and Nihon Shoki (720 CE). By the eighth century when these two documents were produced by royal order, there was already a formal ruling system and a stratified society. Elements considered not suitable for the court’s political purposes were eliminated or modified. It is very illuminating to compare the contents of the two koshi-koden documents with the eighth century versions.

Today’s scholars recognize a long period of peace and culture called the Jōmon period. The name Jōmon was given to describe the cord-marked earthenware said to be the oldest in the world. The Jōmon period lasted from about 14,000 BCE to 300 BCE, a remarkably long period of peace. It was followed by the Yayoi (300 BCE to 300 CE) with significant immigration from the Asian continent which greatly impacted society in the islands. Then came the Kofun period of burial mounds, and so on into historical times.

In terms of Kototama sound order, the Jōmon would be Sugaso and the following periods Kanagi.

Where does the Hotsuma culture belong in this timeline? There are two seeming inconsistencies when dating it. From the spiritually guided nature of Hotsuma society, it would appear to belong to the Sugaso order, at least in the beginning. The early tales are full of compassion and resolution of conflicts by nonviolent means such as negotiation and Kototama. Society was guided to embody Heaven on Earth which means to live in harmony with nature and universe. In the teaching sections of the Hotsuma Tsutae, the lessons emphasized living the Way of Hotsuma which is the Way of Heaven.

We know the sound order of their language through a teaching song, Awa no uta, the song (uta) of Heaven and Earth (A and Wa). It goes like this.

          a ka ha na ma            i ki hi ni mi u ku     

          hu nu mu e ke           he ne me o ko ho no

          mo to ro so yo           wo te re se ye tu ru

          su yu n ti ri                 si yi ta ra sa ya wa

From this we see that the vowel order is Ah Ih Uh Eh Oh, the Kanagi order of the Second Civilization! So we may view the Hotsuma culture as the last gasp of the Sugaso.

As in the above Awa no uta, the entire Hotsuma document is written in verse of 5 and 7 syllables. When a master poet is asked why, she replies because 7 and 5 are the rhythms of Heaven and Earth. Deep study of the Woshite syllabary has led to some understanding of the cosmology of the Hotsuma people.

As later tales unfold, especially the last 12 chapters which were added generations later, we view society moving more and more to materialistic worldviews and behavior, thus fully entering the Kanagi civilization. The sacred is declining and materialty is growing. There are battles of nation-building. While the building of a nation may seem grand and glorious, it comes at the cost of human blood and suffering. These stories mark the beginning of our Second Civilization. Hotsuma tales record the transition from the First to the Second Civilization.

Since Hotsuma times, we have continued down this path of separation and conflict, loss of connection with other people and our environment. We can go no further. We must stop and build the Third Civilization.

The documents mentioned here all include the common story of Ama no Iwato no Hiraki, the opening of the heavenly cave door. All four prophesize that the door of darkness will be opened and light of truth will pour forth once more.

The door is opening.