Category Archives: ley lines

Narasaki’s Lines of Power for Agriculture

Narasaki Iyashirochi figure

Iyashirochi and agriculture

We have learned about Narasaki Kougetsu and the Katakamuna documents which he recorded. Now let us look at his technical work. Narasaki was an eletrical engineer working in the mountains of Hyogo-ken after the Second World War. His work involved electrical power lines with special interest in their effect on the growing of plants and crops. His field work included studying the terrain in the mountain range of Rokkosan. Narasaki found that the location of an iron foundry could be correlated to superior or inferior grades of iron produced there.

He found correlations of mountain peaks and valleys with lines of high and low life energies. Lines of high energy connect mountain peaks. These lines he called iyashirochi. Lines connecting valleys have low energy and he called them kegarechi. Kegare is a word denoting negative qualities.

It is difficult to translate iyashirochi. It is related to places of iyashi or iyasaka, which are positive nouns. Kobayashi Bigen Sensei recommends as a toast to abundance and happiness the ancient Iyasaka! rather than the current Kampai or the former Banzai.

Nevertheless, iyashirochi have high electrical potential. Iyashirochi are characterized by an abundance of negative ions which strengthen the body. Also the negative ions balance the positive ions and there is a natural flow of charges, more energy moving. As Alfred Watkins in England showed, ley lines are lines of power. Iyashirochi may be ley lines of similar power.

Dowsing
As is known, dowsing is a technique used to find deposits of water, ley lines, stone walls, and other underground objects. In Japan, a dowser using a branch of the hashibami hazelnut tree can feel certain changes when near such objects. The explanation is given by a physicist from Sorbonne: underground water affects the earth’s magnetic field. The magnetic field is felt by the dowser’s body, and the effect is magnified and made visible by movement of the branch.

A team of three scientists has connected dowsing to megaliths. John Taylor is a professor at Kings College in England. Eduardo Baronofsky is an Argentinian expert. Bill Louis is a dowser with technical experience. He can feel water under stone circles that is flowing to other stone monuments. He places his hands on megaliths and identifies points of circling, spiraling energy. He measures those places and finds that they have twice the magnetic field strength. From these experiments, we may conclude that megaliths do contain significant energy, in the form of magnetic energy.

Scientists and dowsers report that menhirs, dolmens, and other megalithic works have been placed at points of high energy. Generally these are places where ley lines cross. It can also be noted that in Australia, Aborigines hold ceremonies at power points characterized by megaliths and pictures of snakes. Snakes and their brethren, dragons, often represent these ley lines.

Ed. note:  Illustration and information from Narasaki’s book, Three Electrostatic Laws, see earlier post. Some of the information in this post comes from Akiyoneto, Nazo no Katakamuna Bunmei, Mystery of Katakamuna Civilization, 1981, and Narasaki’s book, Three Electrostatic Laws. See earlier posts. If you use the search box for keywords such as Katakamuna, Narasaki, etc., you will find many other related posts.

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Awa Mystery

Hi-no-michi map

Hi-no-michi Map, Izanagi Jingu, May 2016

In our post on Woshite World, https://woshiteworld.wordpress.com/2016/06/01/894/we mentioned a mystery of an alignment of shrines that has been proposed at Isanagi Jingu on Awajishima, in Awaji-no-kuni. We first encountered it here, Onogoro and Kuni-umi Myth.  Then we received much information from Hitoshi Uchiyama. We are grateful to him for sharing the results of his research.

There is a theory that all the “Awa” place names are related in some way. For the sake of discussion, let us disregard the kanji rendering of “Awa.” There are several different kanji and they may be totally irrelevant to the reasoning of the story. We must remember that Awa is a word from Isanami/Isanagi times, long before kanji was introduced into the written language. That is to say, “Awa” would have been written in Woshite moji with the Woshite syllables for “A” and “Wa.” In hiragana, it is written  あわ.

Awaji.  We have noted that Isanagi Jingu on Awaji island has a monument with a map of shrine alignments called Hi-no-michi. Hi-no-michi means path of the sun. This shrine is ichinomiya of Awaji. Note that Awaji means road to Awa.

Awa-no-kuni.  There are two Awa-no-kuni we’ve mentioned so far. The original at Oumi from the time of Isanami and Isanagi. The other is Awa-no-kuni on Shikoku, adjacent to Awaji (now Tokushima, home of the popular awa-odori). There is a third Awa in today’s Chiba-ken. And there is an indirect connection between Kumano and Awa in Chiba through some place names in common, such as Shirahama and Katsu-ura. 

Awa in Hida.   Norikuradake, Mt. Norikura, in Hida was once called Awa-dake, Mt. Awa. And, at the border of Hida and Shinano kuni (now Nagano), there is Abo-toge Pass, written with kanji that can be read “Awa-toge.” This makes four places where Awa is found.

Miyazaki.   Now, let’s introduce the (possibly) unifying element, Jimmu Tenno. He bore the name Kamuyamato-Iwarehiko in the seventh century BCE, a sixth-generation descendant of Isanami and Isanagi. He unified the land of Yamato beginning from Miyazaku, Kyushu. The Miyazaki area was called Himuka or Hyuga.

Iwarehiko developed plantations in different areas. Fusa-no-kuni is in present Chiba-ken. During the campaign, Iwarehiko was also in Osaka and Kumano. The similarity of cultures can be noted among Hyugo/Miyazaki, Awa/Shikoku, Kumano (east coast of Kii), and Awa/Chiba. These are all places visited by Iwarebiko. One can surmise that he is possibly the unifying factor among them. A look at the southern coastlines of Honshu, Shikoku and the eastern part of Kyushu — all places where he has been — can be convincing.

Alignment Theory.   This reasoning has led some to believe that perhaps Iwarehiko is the one who initiated the alignment of shrines such as that on the Hi-no-Michi of Isanagi Jingu on Awajishima. The shrine’s GPS coordinates are 34.46, 134.85.

Shrines of the Hi-no-Michi Alignment.   There are four cardinal directions and four solsticial directions, centered at Isanagi Jingu. At latitude 35 degrees, the solstice directions are 30 degrees north and south of east and west. (At latitude 34.5, the solstice angles are less than 30 degrees.) This makes for the stunning geometry seen in the alignment map. The cardinal shrines are:

North:   Izushi Jinja  出石 神社 (ichinomiya of Tajima 但馬国 , Tamba-no-kuni)

East:   Ise Jingu 伊勢神宮 (内宮 Naigu)     

South:   Yuzuruha Jinja  諭鶴羽(ユズルハ), Awajishima

West:   Kaijin Jinja 海神 神社(かいじんじんじゃ), Tsushima

The solsticial shrines are:

SSR:   Suwa Taisha 諏訪大社 (ichinomiya of Shinano  信濃国一宮)

WSR:   Kumano Taisha  熊野大社

WSS:   Takachiho Jinja  高千穂神社, Ama-no-Iwato Jinja  天岩戸神社

SSS:   Izumo Taisha  出雲大社 (ichinomiya of Izumo), Hinomisaki Jinja  日御碕神社

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Oyu Stone Circles

Oyu stone circles were made by Jomon people thousands of years ago. They have solsticial markers. There are two major circles.  Here is the first, called Manza.

IMG_0319 IMG_0320 IMG_0321 IMG_0322 IMG_0323

Look closely at the mountain in the third and fourth photos. It is Kuromanta yama.

This is the second site, Nonaka.

IMG_0329 IMG_0328IMG_0330

This standing stone is surrounded by directional stones. Note how the Japanese stone circles differ from the European ones. For one, the standing stones are not so tall. For another, they have this type of arrangement of stones. Do you see the cardinal directions in the photo below? This circle is said to have solstice directions which are, at this latitude, thirty degrees from east-west.

IMG_0373250px-Map_of_Japan_with_highlight_on_04_Miyagi_prefecture.svg

Akita is near the northern end of Honshu.

KOBAYASHI: Koshinto Nyumon Part 1

Kobayashi Biigen is an interesting author. We will post some of his writings. Guji Kobayashi KobayashiCoverpassed away a few years ago.

Kobayashi Bigen, Koshinto Nyumon, 1998

Chapter 7 Kannagara naru Omichi he:  Energy Lines pp244-249

The Author: Kobayashi Sensei was guji for 37 years. Born in Taipei in 1927, served on battleship. Attended Shinto school at Atsuta Jinja 12 years; guji at Kumano Motomiya; Omiya Jinja 11 years; Ishikiri Tsurugiya Jinja 13 years. He also spent some time in Europe but unfortunately for us, he hasn’t published in the English language. He was exceptionally knowledgeable in broad areas of sacred wisdom and philosophy, and we are trying hard to translate his works. Here is a part of the last chapter in this book. He is writing about energy lines connecting sacred places in Japan. They have something to do with how principles in the universe are reflected as patterns on earth.

Fig26 Fig27Fig28On pages 245ff Kobayashi shows what he terms energy lines in Figures 26 – 31. He begins with an area centered on Awaji Shima, the legendary birthplace of Japan. See Fig. 26.

Fig. 26 shows a triangular alignment ABC, distance 160 km between apexes.

A  Chigamine (mountain) Hyogo

B  Tamakiyama, Nara

C  Tsurugiyama, Shikoku

On those mountain tops are himorogi/iwakura from 15,000 yearso ago.

Fig. 27 is a larger region and shows a circle passing through points A, B, and D, where

D  Izanagi Jingu, Awaji no Ichinomiya

Then the circle also passes through

E  Ise no Naiku

F  Ibukiyama

G  Oue Yama, Motoise Naiku

Fig. 28 is an even larger region. A star-shape is formed by connecting jinja. The lines of the star are DE, EG, GH, HF,FD. Points on the star are G F E H D, where

H  Kumano Motomiya Taisha

If we extend GF to the east, we get a straight line to

J   Fuji Yama

Extending to the west, our line goes to

K  Izumo Taisha

Additional alignments are shown in Figs. 29 – 31 of his book, not shown here, with points L M N.

L  Kushimoto Ushiyo-misaki, Wakayama

M  Kaizu

N  Suwa Taisha

O  Nikko Futa-areyama Jinja (Toshogu)

He mentions some names which I have not succeeded in tracking down: Nakanishi Akira, professor, who studied himorogi, iwakura; Yamada Hirokuni, shocho/manager Stock Data Systems, studied triangular alignments of shrines. Also Yamashita Hiromichi, “Haruka naru daichi Mu kara no Yogen” published by Tama Shuppan.

On p. 243, he states that we have the power to connect to energies. The ancient Japanese prevented earthquakes by praying. Their oinori saved Japan from sinking like the Mu continent. Here is a similar map we found on the Internet.

Image

This image is from  http://whowont.com/wisdom/ley-line-maps/japan-line-map.html.