Category Archives: Sacred sites

Power Places and the Kanayama Megaliths

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Megaliths as Power Places

Earth and Celestial Energies.  Humans have long held a deep relationship with Earth and its energies. Even as hunter-gatherers, early man knew places of power as sacred places. They gathered at these sites to honor and venerate life-giving energies of Earth and Sky.

People became aware of fluctuations of these terrestrial energies, and they realized that these earth cycles were related to celestial cycles, the movements of Sun, Moon, and stars in our sky. They knew how to live in harmony with these energies.

Megaliths.  Soon, humans learned that these energies could benefit the health and welfare of people and society, that these energies were associated with naturally occuring megaliths. They learned, as they settled down and began cultivating crops, how to improve their lives. At first, they utilized megaliths to mark significant places. Then they assembled them into megalithic structures, often moving huge boulders from far away, to these special sites — how we do not know. Thus, energies were enhanced. Energies could be redirected to areas where needed, for example, to their crop fields. Megalithic structures could be erected to tamp excessive earth energies such as those due to earthquakes.

As modern research technologies have advanced, and our minds have been opened to new ways of viewing early societies, we have come to better understand early man. These megalithic places served multiple purposes, the least and the last of which was to serve as cemeteries. Through more accurate dating of materials, we know that the structures were built in the 4,000 BCE time-frame, that they were later and only occasionally re-purposed as burial sites.

Purposes of megaliths.  As mentioned, megalithic sites served to mark sacred places; they were developed to manage earth and celestial energies to benefit society. And, finally, megalithic structures were designed and built and operated to serve as observatories. They could then provide accurate data for calendars and for predicting future celestial phenomena, to know when there would be significant changes in energy.

Each of these megalithic observatories investigated the celestial body pertinent to that particular site. Although these observatories were a late development, there are not so many that are known to us today. 

In summary, let’s list the purposes of megaliths and megalithic structures, in roughly chronological order.

+ Identify locations of sacred sites,

+ Hold sacred ceremonies to venerate life-giving force of Universe,

+ Control and manage energies for beneficial purposes,

+ Learn periodic fluctuations of celestial energies affecting earth energies,

+ Observe celestial phenomena in specially-built observatories to determine more exactly the timing of special energies,

+ Determine an accurate calendar of the year/years.

Kanayama Megalithic Observatory

Deep in a mountain forest on the main island of the Japanese archipelago lies a megalithic solar observatory. This site has recently come to the attention of those outside of Japan as the source of a super-accurate solar calendar. This calendar of the tropical year is based on sunlight observation and is 15 times more accurate than our modern calendar. The megaliths were shaped and assembled more than 5,000 years ago. We know, because later humans deposited ashes that have so been dated.

Japanese news media have termed this solar observatory a “power spot”. People have been coming from near and far to experience this remarkable achievement from long ago. They are amazed at the ancient people’s knowledge of astronomy, of their skill in shaping 100-ton and 200-ton blocks of stone, of moving them with precision into desired — and well-planned — configurations. These configurations enable a human observer to accurately track sunbeams and their patterns over the course of the year. at special times, special phenomena are observed. These times of observation determine the solar calendar.

This sun-tracking station is situated amidst tall trees in the mountains near a rushing river. To track the sun would have been simpler if the site were on a flat plain as in most other calendrical observatories. However, the site was cleverly chosen so that it could operate in winter as well as in summer, throughout the entire tropical year.

What’s also remarkable is that two non-specialist researchers have, in less than 20 years, decoded the purpose of this megalithic site. Actually, it is a system of three sites which cooperate to produce all the needed observations, and more. These modern researchers in fact have accomplished their own feat of reverse engineering. They have deduced, from what they themselves have observed, what the original purpose of each megalithic solar event was, and the functions of each megalithic structure.

And to top it off, they are able to explain to the large tour groups how it all works, in language that is simple and direct, uncluttered by scientific jargon. They have already published a fully-illustrated guidebook to the site and have a more technical bi-lingual book in preparation.

The Kanayama Megaliths are a living example of an ancient scientific system. To young children and adults alike it teaches basic astronomy ‘in the field’ so that everyone can experience being a sun tracker in megalithic times.

Concluding Remarks

Megaliths are found all over the globe. They are well-known in Europe, less evident in the Far East. This post was inspired by the article of Martin Gray  about megaliths of Europe. We then related it to our own research at Kanayama Megaliths.  Photo of a tour group at Kanayama Megaliths by Okunomichi.

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Yamanomoya – Mountains and Shrines of Mystery

As part of the research program on Ancient Japan, Okunomichi has paid a lot of attention to the jinja shrines and their kami that played a role in Hinomoto which led to modern Japan. Many shrines have been mentioned in ancient texts and by other researchers. For that reason, Okunomichi has been actually going to the mountains and visiting these historical jinja.

Now, Okunomichi is moving its posts on jinja and pyramid mountains to https://yamanomiya.wordpress.com/. So we would like to introduce you to Yamanomiya.

Jinja

The shrines described by Yamanomiya are connected historically to ancient documents in the Woshite literature (namely, the Hotsuma Tsutae). And to the kami that are prominent in that literature: Toyoke/Toyouke O-kami, Isanami-O-kami, Isanagi O-kami, Amateru-kami, Seoritsuhime, Shirayamahime, and others.

At Yamanomiya, there are a series of posts on the Moto-Ise shrines. These are the shrines where the kami of the current Ise Jingu Naiku and Geku — Amateru and Toyouke, respectively — were honored that were located, in Tamba no Kuni (in current Kyoto-fu), previous to Ise in the Kii peninsula. Legend says that it was Yamatohime who traveled from place to place until finally settling the enshrinements of Amateru Amakami and his grandfather Toyoke-Okami in Ise. This was long before the Ise shrines were adopted by the Imperial Family, even before there was even such a family.

Pyramid mountains

Yamanomiya also reports on the many pyramid mountains in Japan. In particular, you will find lists of pyramid mountains claimed by researchers Sakai, Kosaka, and Suzuki, Pyramid mountains were built thousands of years ago out of natural hills by human hands. They were made for ritual and societal purposes. They were usually flattened on top so that sacred ceremonies could be held, and today there are still shrines there.

Pyramids stabilized the land during earthquakes. They sent energy down to the land below to improve the productivity of farming. Pyramids and shrines were situated in very special geometrical and astronomical layouts. Frequently the lines connecting them pointed to the summer or winter solstice sunrises and sunsets.

And of course, the mountains of interest are considered especially sacred to kami, whether they are man-made or natural.

Let’s explore mountains and shrines with Yamanomiya!

 

 

Hida Koku and Birth of Hida Kuni Jomon Dynasty

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Iwaya-Iwakage,our sister site, has just posted a series of articles that begins:

Birth of Hida Kuni Jomon Dynasty

The land of Hida, where the Kanayama Megaliths are located, may not be so well known historically as other parts of the country such as Kyoto and Nara. And yet its history stems from the Jomon Period, 12,000 BCE to 300 BCE. In the article presented below, the unnamed author declares that there are many folkloric sources that reveal the possibility that Hida was the  place where civilization began, ultimately leading to the modern nation of Japan. 

https://iwakage.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/hida-koku/

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Awa Mystery

Hi-no-michi map

Hi-no-michi Map, Izanagi Jingu, May 2016

In our post on Woshite World, https://woshiteworld.wordpress.com/2016/06/01/894/we mentioned a mystery of an alignment of shrines that has been proposed at Isanagi Jingu on Awajishima, in Awaji-no-kuni. We first encountered it here, Onogoro and Kuni-umi Myth.  Then we received much information from Hitoshi Uchiyama. We are grateful to him for sharing the results of his research.

There is a theory that all the “Awa” place names are related in some way. For the sake of discussion, let us disregard the kanji rendering of “Awa.” There are several different kanji and they may be totally irrelevant to the reasoning of the story. We must remember that Awa is a word from Isanami/Isanagi times, long before kanji was introduced into the written language. That is to say, “Awa” would have been written in Woshite moji with the Woshite syllables for “A” and “Wa.” In hiragana, it is written  あわ.

Awaji.  We have noted that Isanagi Jingu on Awaji island has a monument with a map of shrine alignments called Hi-no-michi. Hi-no-michi means path of the sun. This shrine is ichinomiya of Awaji. Note that Awaji means road to Awa.

Awa-no-kuni.  There are two Awa-no-kuni we’ve mentioned so far. The original at Oumi from the time of Isanami and Isanagi. The other is Awa-no-kuni on Shikoku, adjacent to Awaji (now Tokushima, home of the popular awa-odori). There is a third Awa in today’s Chiba-ken. And there is an indirect connection between Kumano and Awa in Chiba through some place names in common, such as Shirahama and Katsu-ura. 

Awa in Hida.   Norikuradake, Mt. Norikura, in Hida was once called Awa-dake, Mt. Awa. And, at the border of Hida and Shinano kuni (now Nagano), there is Abo-toge Pass, written with kanji that can be read “Awa-toge.” This makes four places where Awa is found.

Miyazaki.   Now, let’s introduce the (possibly) unifying element, Jimmu Tenno. He bore the name Kamuyamato-Iwarehiko in the seventh century BCE, a sixth-generation descendant of Isanami and Isanagi. He unified the land of Yamato beginning from Miyazaku, Kyushu. The Miyazaki area was called Himuka or Hyuga.

Iwarehiko developed plantations in different areas. Fusa-no-kuni is in present Chiba-ken. During the campaign, Iwarehiko was also in Osaka and Kumano. The similarity of cultures can be noted among Hyugo/Miyazaki, Awa/Shikoku, Kumano (east coast of Kii), and Awa/Chiba. These are all places visited by Iwarebiko. One can surmise that he is possibly the unifying factor among them. A look at the southern coastlines of Honshu, Shikoku and the eastern part of Kyushu — all places where he has been — can be convincing.

Alignment Theory.   This reasoning has led some to believe that perhaps Iwarehiko is the one who initiated the alignment of shrines such as that on the Hi-no-Michi of Isanagi Jingu on Awajishima. The shrine’s GPS coordinates are 34.46, 134.85.

Shrines of the Hi-no-Michi Alignment.   There are four cardinal directions and four solsticial directions, centered at Isanagi Jingu. At latitude 35 degrees, the solstice directions are 30 degrees north and south of east and west. (At latitude 34.5, the solstice angles are less than 30 degrees.) This makes for the stunning geometry seen in the alignment map. The cardinal shrines are:

North:   Izushi Jinja  出石 神社 (ichinomiya of Tajima 但馬国 , Tamba-no-kuni)

East:   Ise Jingu 伊勢神宮 (内宮 Naigu)     

South:   Yuzuruha Jinja  諭鶴羽(ユズルハ), Awajishima

West:   Kaijin Jinja 海神 神社(かいじんじんじゃ), Tsushima

The solsticial shrines are:

SSR:   Suwa Taisha 諏訪大社 (ichinomiya of Shinano  信濃国一宮)

WSR:   Kumano Taisha  熊野大社

WSS:   Takachiho Jinja  高千穂神社, Ama-no-Iwato Jinja  天岩戸神社

SSS:   Izumo Taisha  出雲大社 (ichinomiya of Izumo), Hinomisaki Jinja  日御碕神社

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“No volcanoes, no agriculture”

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Paramagnetism: Rediscovering Nature’s Secret Force of Growth, 1995

“No volcanoes, no agriculture — for volcanic ash and rock are the guts of good soil.”

Recently, I came across ‘paramagnetism’ in two ways. I was searching for “Satsuki Narasaki’, author of Three Electrostatic Laws, when I came across a Russian article in which the writer used charcoal in growing plants as is traditional in Japan. He referred to the work of Japanese physicist Narasaki as well as books by Philip S. Callahan on paramagnetism.

The following day, an e-mail newsletter about feng shui arrived. It was entitled, “Paramagnetism: war and peace.” Not only is paramagnetism a positive factor in growing healthy crops, it seems to be inversely correlated with war zones!

And so I ordered a copy of Callahan’s book, Paramagnetism: Rediscovering Nature’s Secret Force of Growth, 1995. With a doctorate in entymology, Callahan is a first-rate all-around scientist, in the mold of the natural historians of old. Knowledgeable about physics as easily as birds and insects, eager to improve agricultural yields, he presents a wealth of easy-to-read information on all these seemingly-unrelated fields related to paramagnetism.

The following excerpts may be of interest to Okunomichi’s readers.

p29 We may understand then that there are three ways to generate this valuable magnetic force called paramagnetism into the soil:

1.  By adding volcanic rock into the soil.

2.  By fiberization so that paramagnetic oxygen reaches the roots in soggy soil.

3.  By using weeds, which are green containers of paramagnetic minerals, in our compost or manure.

p36 In Japan one gets a feeling of restfulness in the wooden and thatch-roofed Shinto shrine of the sacred groves. I began to feel that if the vital force of rocky places made one feel energetic and the wooden shrines and trees of sacred groves made one feel relaxed, that there seemed to be two forces at work. One force was calming and restful, the other energizing and fatigue defeating. Perhaps in Eastern terms, the yin of the female and the yang of the male?

It was through reading the brilliant writings of the Irish genius John Tyndall that I finally realized that these vital forces were not magnetic … but the paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties of rocks and plants.

p37 Diamagnetism is a negative movement, or movement away from a magnetic field. Paramagnetism is a strong positive attraction to a magnet. Most organic molecules are diamagnetic and most volcanic rock and ash are paramagnetic.

p33 Forms which Westerners would consider inanimate have become fused with vitality through Shinto. Whereas we in the West would mould or break natural form to our design, the Japanese, recognizing vitality inherent in the form, shape, and design to release the vitality.   The Ocean in the Sand by Mark Holborn

p46 Most organic compounds, including all plants, are diamagnetic. If plants are diamagnetic and good growing soil paramagnetic, then we must be dealing with the yin and yang of Chinese and Japanese geomancy.

p47 By positioning such rocks in relationship to the sun and to each other, one can control plant growth. Apparently the ancients knew about this yin and yang, diamagnetic/paramagnetic phenomenon and utilized it in their Zen gardens.

Paramagnetism is associated with:

  • Volcanic rocks , granite, basalt 
  • Oxygen 
  • Yang 
  • Sacred sites

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Jade, Tectonics, and Sacred Sites

My first magatama was a jade bead purchased at Takachiho Jinja. Although magatama are made of various stones, I had a sense that jade is the most appropriate stone. Recently while conversing with a guji-san at a jinja he said that the only source of jade in Japan is Itoigawa in Niigata-ken. This was in connection with how people of the past avoided battle by negotiating and exchanging gifts such as jewelry. Here is some information which I have gathered about hisui jade and magatama beads. It turns out that jade is found in tectonic regions, and there are many stories about sacred sites in Japan being located on the Median Tectonic Line.

Magatama

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Magatama have long held deep spiritual meaning. The curved shape represents growth of a fetus, movement of the universe, the human soul. Magatama are comma-shaped beads which were made during the late Jomon period through the Kofun period, 1000 BCE to 600 CE. They were made of various stones and used as pendants and necklaces. By the end of the Kofun period they were mostly made of jade and used for ceremonial and religious purposes. They still possess a high symbolic value.

Jade and jadeite

—Jade is the gemstone name for two different mineral forms, Jadeite and Nephrite. [http://www.minerals.net/gemstone/jade_gemstone.aspx]

— Itoigawa is an important deposit of jadeite.  [http://www.minerals.net/mineral/jadeite.aspx]

Itoigawa jadeite and magatama

‘The only source of jadeite in East Asia is from the Jade Coast in Niigata prefecture of Japan and known as “Itoigawa jade”…  Itoigawa jadeite from Niigata is collected from the Hime River emptying onto the “Jade Coast” in the Japan Sea…  Itoigawa jadeite was utilized in Japan from Jomon times, particularly in the 1st millennium BC. The ornaments of these hunter-gatherer-horticulturalists consisted of slit earrings and pebble pendants…  In the Kofun period of state formation (250–645AD), curved beads became an important insignia of the elite, and the curved bead (magatama), bronze mirror and sword comprise the imperial regalia of the Japanese emperor.’   [Gina L. Barnes, http://www.academia.edu/11781202/JADE_its_tectonic_formation_geochemistry_and_archaeology_in_East_Asia_in_reverse_order]

Jade is produced by crustal movement, formed when a subducting plate is brought up to the surface by tectonic movements. An archaeological site from about 2,600 BCE has revealed that jade was processed in Itoigawa. Almost all of the jade artifacts of the Jomon culture were produced in Itoigawa, and not only distributed across the country but even to the Korean Peninsula. This makes this the oldest jade culture in the world.  [http://www.globalgeopark.org/aboutGGN/list/Japan/6443.htm, http://www.geo-itoigawa.com/eng/geosite/geosite9/index.html ].

‘4000 BC Neolithic Jadeite culture in Japan! The Jadeite from the Itoigawa area was used in prehistoric times by people of the Jomon culture (4000 to 1600 BC) for fashioning first tools and then beads and pendants (taishu’s) and later on also the well known comma or cashew shaped Jade pendants or Magatamas. A Neolithic Jomon settlement has been excavated on Myama, a small hill overlooking Itoigawa City and all the artifacts assembled in a newly build museum the Chojagahara Archeology Hall. Jadeite use died out in Japan around 700 AD.’   [sic, Herbert Geiss, http://www.friendsofjade.org/current-article/2003/10/1/jade-news-fall-2003.html ]

Continental tectonic plates

The large map of the continental plates is from http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/dynamic/slabs.html.  The archipelago of Japan can be dimly seen on the upper left, where the (green) Eurasian plate meets the (brown) North American tectonic plate. Also seen bordering the (yellow) Pacific plate is the infamous Ring of Fire of volcanic activity.

中央構造線 (ちゅうおうこうぞうせん)  Median Tectonic Line

The Median Tectonic Line of Japan is where the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates meet. [Ref. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan_Median_Tectonic_Line ] The second map showing the Median Tectonic Line (red line) is from http://www.tohyamago.com/rekisi/chuoukouzousen_suwa/ . In this map, the Eurasian plate is pink and the North American plate is green. The Fossa Magna (shown in blue) is a zone of deformation and low topography.

Itoigawa is situated on the Japan Sea coast of Hokuriku Northlands. It is directly on the Itoigawa-Shizuoka portion of the Median Tectonic Line at the boundary where the Eurasian plate meets the Fossa Magna.

Median Tectonic Line

Median Tectonic Line

Median Tectonic Line and Sacred Sites

The geology of the ground on either side of the Median Tectonic Line differs greatly since they were created at different geological times. In some places the respective magnetic fields may cancel out, leaving a zero magnetic field at the interface.

Many sacred sites have been recognized on the Median Tectonic Line. See the third map showing sacred sites which is from https://www.facebook.com/yasuyuki.fujita1/posts/645751485489972 . They include, starting in the west (left):

Heitate Jingu on Mt. Aso, Kyushu Island

Ishizuchi Yama on Shikoku Island

Koyasan, Yoshino, and Ise Jingu on the Kii Peninsula

Suwa Taisha, Nagano Alps

Rieko Ido, Japanese history and anthropology researcher, has stated in this online article (no longer available), http://www.wattention.com/archives/japanese-sanctuaries-and-the-median-tectonic-line/:

‘Many famous Japanese shrines considered sacred since ancient times were built along this median tectonic line. One also cannot overlook the fact that rich minerals were deposited in the soil of median tectonic line because of repeated volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Here we can see a strong relationship between Japanese sanctuaries and minerals. According to the old records. There used to be more eruptions and earthquakes in Japan. so it is easy to guess that the existence of many shrines built on the median tectonic line were closely related to religious faith in order to calm down eruptions and earthquakes. In fact, if you visit shrines. you will see that the gods enshrined in places of worship are most often symbols to quieten down the wrath of Nature.’

Sacred sites on Median Tectonic Line

Sacred sites on Median Tectonic Line

Further research is necessary in order to understand the relationship between tectonic lines and sacred sites. Still, isn’t it fitting that the hisui jadeite in magatama comes from a region associated with sanctuaries and sacred sites?

 

 

2017.07.21 Update

Long history in Japan helps make jade the ‘national stone’

By YOICHI MASUDA/ Staff Writer, The Asahi Shimbun, September 25, 2016 at 16:30 JST

KANAZAWA–Stuck between a rock and a hard place, voters chose jade as Japan’s “national stone” over quartz. The selection was made here on Sept. 24 [2016] during the annual meeting of the Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences. … because jade culture in Japan is the oldest in the world, having its roots about 7,000 years ago.

 

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