Tag Archives: Tanabata

Sendai Tanabata Matsuri, August 6-8, 2018

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Sendai Tanabata

Sendai Tanabata festivals have been popular events since the time of the first lord of Sendai and hero Date Masamune (1567 – 1636). Two million visitors have been attending in recent years. The civic center and business areas are festooned with colorful streamers representing light coming from stars. To adjust for our modern solar calendar, Sendai observes Tanabata in August. This year, the dates were August 6, 7, and 8, 2018. Tanabata has become a romantic story of two Milky-Way-crossed lovers who meet once a year on this night. This adjunct to the original weaving theme probably came from China in the 8th century, and was further enlarged upon by Sendai merchants in the 17th cenury. So it is now a far cry from the simple nature-based Jomon festival.

Tanahata Maturi of Jomon Period

The Tanabata Hoshi Matsuri goes far back to Jomon times, when it was called Tanahata Hosi Maturi, the weaving loom star festival of the seventh night of the seventh lunar month. This is the night of the first quarter moon of our eighth month. On that night, Jomon people would look up at the Milky Way and thank ancestors for providing food and shelter and clothing. As part of the ceremony, they would perform ritual weaving on the tanahata loom. And in their gratitude and joy for all their blessings, they would dance all night. Weaving is a metaphor for the orderliness of Universe, where warp and woof threads are properly aligned and balanced. And where warp and woof represent male and female, without their meeting there would be no children.

This is one of the many seasonal maturi described in the the Hotuma Tutaye and Misakahumi ancient documents written in Wosite characters.

Modern Tanabata Decorations

These photos were taken on August 8, 2018 in Sendai. Note the kusudama balls below which streamers of washi paper float in the breeze. The traditional tanzaku strips of paper have wishes written on them and are hung on bamboo branches. There were many modern designs as well. And, as usual, there are decorations of thousands of origami cranes for peace.

Enjoy these cheerful works of art as you send your prayers of gratitude to your ancestors.

 

 

 

 

Photos by (c) C.N.

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Hotsuma Tsutae Aya One: “Sono waka wa” by Waniko

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These opening lines from the  Hotsuma Tsutae appear in the Waniko edition published by the Japan Translation Center in 2001 and 2016. They are shown here with the kind permission of Mr. Seiji Takabatake of JTC. We wanted to show you how beautifully the writing of Waniko Yasutoshi from 1779 has been reproduced. For further information, please see our earlier post.

Hotsuma Tsutae Aya One

Hotsuma Tsutae Mihata no Hatu:  Kitu no na to homusi saru aya
Sore waka wa        wakahime no kami         

     That waka of Wakahime Kami,

suterarete       hirota to sotatu        

     Given away and taken up to raise

kanasaki no        tuma no chi wo ete        

     Kanasaki’s wife gave her milk

awa-u-wa ya        te uti sio no me        

     Baby clapping awa-u-wa with the gentle wife.

ume-re-hi wa        kasimi-ke sonae        

     On her birthday, he made an offering of cooked food.