Magnetic Field of our Milky Way Galaxy and the Magellanic Bridge

Milky Way galaxy’s magnetic field. Image by Planck satellite 2014 via ESA/ Planck/ APOD.

From EarthSky.Org:

Scientists have found a magnetic bridge between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. They’re calling it the Magellanic Bridge.

This eye-catching image depicts the magnetic field of our own Milky Way galaxy. We don’t often think about our galaxy’s magnetic field, do we? Or a magnetic bridge between galaxies? Well, EarthSky has posted a story about the newly-dubbed Magellanic Bridge, a magnetic bridge between two galaxies. These are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, satellites to our galaxy. No, the image above is not the bridge, which cannot be imaged at this time.

Jane Kaczmarek is a doctoral student at the University of Sydney, and she’s lead author of the paper in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. EarthSky quotes her:

‘The observation of the magnetic field, which is one millionth the strength of the Earth’s, may provide insight into whether it was generated from within the Bridge after the structure formed, or was ‘ripped’ from the dwarf galaxies when they interacted and formed the structure.’

‘In general, we don’t know how such vast magnetic fields are generated, nor how these large-scale magnetic fields affect galaxy formation and evolution … Understanding the role that magnetic fields play in the evolution of galaxies and their environment is a fundamental question in astronomy that remains to be answered.’

For the full story, please follow the link to EarthSky.

http://earthsky.org/space/a-giant-magnetic-bridge-between-galaxies

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The Super-Science of Katakamuna, by K. Fukano – 3.

 

Two WorldsLatent and Phenomenal Worlds

by K. Fukano

For reference, we present the complete syllabary chart of Katakamuna. This chart is from K. Fukano’s book. Fukano has placed the Katakamuna symbols in modern syllable order, for the sake of the modern reader. It was probably not done this way in Katakamuna days. Note that in the “u” row, the leftmost entry is “n” where “wu” should be. That is the way it is done in modern times. However, there is reason to believe that it was originally “wu.”

Katakamuna Syllabary

by K. Fukano

Katakamuna AIUEO

Fukano uses this chart to demonstrate the similarities of Katakamuna and katakana syllables. He suggests that Katakamuna is the root of katakana. He points out characters ki, sa, to, yi, ra, and ri. What do you see?

For comparison with Wosite, here is the Wosite syllabary of 48 characters. Note that Wosite consonant order varies from the order shown above. Consonant order is important because it is an indication of the process of development during that time period. The biggest difference is that there is no “n” in Wosite. Instead, in the proper place there is indeed “wu.”

Wosite Syllabary

by Y. Matsumoto

Wosite 48.001

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The Super-Science of Katakamuna, by K. Fukano – 2.

KATAKAMUNA 3 centers

We continue reporting on the book by physicist K. Fukano. He has studied the 80 verses of the Katakamuna scrolls as presented by Narasaki, and has interpreted them according to his own knowledge of physics. Katakamuna verses are written in the style of waka, i.e., in rhythm of five and seven, five and seven, etc. They are written in spiral fashion beginning in the middle. In the center is a circular symbol, one of the three shown here. The most coKATAKAMUNA verses 5 & 6mmon circle is the Yatanokakami symbol, the one on top which occurs in 71 out of 80 verses. The next is called Futomani which appears in 7, and the bottom circle is the Mikumari, in 2 verses.

These two spirals are Verses 5 and 6 of the Katakamuna scrolls. Together they are the most important. Verse 5 has 24 characters. Verse 6 has 24+5 characters, the last five being “Ka ta ka mu na,” which may be taken to be the title of this work, and will be omitted from the analysis.

Together, these two verses have 48 syllables/characters. All of the Katakamuna characters appear once and only once in these two verses. The spiraling characters have been put into the form of a table, as shown at bottom. This chart comes from Narasaki’s “orange booklet,” Ultra-Ancient Civilization of Japan, which we reported on earlier. By studying the chart, we can figure out how the character syllabary was organized and formed.

Before going on, we’d like to give this excerpt from the earlier post. We wrote:

Narasaki learned from the scrolls that spinning and orbiting are the basic nature of time and space. Because of the spinning and orbiting motions, there is a center of motion and the  energy is equal in all directions. This wave movement makes magnetic and electrical energy. This affects mountains, the environment, humans, and plants.

Character Order of Katakamuna

The organization of the Katakamuna syllabary of characters is not by a, i, u, e, o, although those are indeed the five vowels. Let us read Verse 5:

hi hu mi yo i     ma wa ri te me ku ru

mu na ya ko to     a u no su he si re

Verse 5

Verse 5

Now, look at the two sequences of five characters:  hi fu mi yo i      mu na ya ko to. These are the numbers from one to ten!

HI FU MI.002

Next, examine the small circle going around the larger circle. Starting from the “east” position, the circle moves counter-clockwise from hi (1) through ya (8), and there is a double small circle for ko (9), and finally no circle at all for to (10). Already, we see that the character sequence describes movement in space and time. It may represent the sun’s cycle as seen from earth, from sunrise to the next sunrise. We have learned in Part 1 that the small circle is called Mari and the large circle is Ma.

You can study Verse 6 in the same way.

ka ta ti sa ki     so ra ni mo ro ke se

yu ye nu o wo     ha e tu yi ne ho n*

Note: possibly “n” was originally pronounced “wu.” See Part 3.

Verse 6

Verse 6

The characters may be grouped according to their similarities. The seven characters, ma wa ri te me ku ru,  do seem to be related, don’t they? And so for the second set of seven, a u no su he si re. We can group the characters in this fashion all the way to the end.

Yatanokakami

Yatanokakami and 48 characters

48 in Yatanokakami

The chart above has grouped the 48 characters into similar patterns. The illustration makes a point: all 48 symbols come from the Yatanokakami symbol. The circular symbol with eight small circles in the center of Verses 5 and 6 and the vast majority of the verses is called Yatanokakami. What is it, and what does it mean? Let us break this long word down into its constituent parts. Ka can mean root, and it can stand for chikara, power. Mi is essence (e.g., fruit). Therefore, kami is the essence of the root or essence of the power.

What is kakami? We usually think that a kagami is a mirror. In this case, using the two meanings of ka, we have: the essence of the root of the power.

What is yatanoYa is eight in traditional Japanese. Yatano means fully saturated. It is equivalent to eight electrons fully saturating the orbit around the nucleus of an atom.

Finally, Yatanokakami means the fully saturated essence of the root of the power. That is represented by the symbol of the Ma circle and its eight Mari circles. In other words, it is the cosmology of Ama, Universe. And Katakamuna is the root of Universe.

Table of Verses 5 and 6

Verses 5-6

Comments

In the above poems, we have used original syllable pronunciations, not the more recent Chinese sounds. The four Sino-Japanese sounds are chi (originally ti), tsu (tu), shi (si) and fu (hu).

You may have noted a lack of dakuon voiced consonants. Ancient languages followed the Kototama principle and avoided dakuon because it darkens vocal energy. Examples of voiced (unvoiced) syllables: da (ta),  zu (su), bi (hi). See also other posts with keyword “Kototama” by Okunomichi and by WoshiteWorld.wordpress.com.

Revised 2017.04.14

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The Super-Science of Katakamuna, by K. Fukano – 1.

KatakamunaCover

In an earlier post entitled, KATAKAMUNA ANCIENT CIVILIZATION, we mentioned a book written by Fukano:

Fukano Kazuyuki, 超科学書「カタカムナ」の謎, Chogakusho Katakamuna no Nazo, Super-Science Katakamuna Mystery, Kosaido Books, 1993

We have been studying the book and we present this summary of the main points of the super-physics as we understand them. While most of us think of Katakamuna as an ancient writing system of Hinomoto, author Fukano has interpreted the verses as descriptions of the physics of Universe. What is remarkable is that such an old physics could be so like modern physics. Put another way, our modern physics may be approaching what was known to ancient people! Indeed, Katakamuna’s Latent and Physical Worlds may correspond to David Bohm’s Implicate and Explicate Orders

Katakamuna Universe

What is Katakamuna? Katakamuna is the root of all in Universe. Ama is Universe and includes Time, Space, and Everything. The Space aspect of Universe is Ame. Time and Space together are Ma. Mari is the fundamental quantum which is always spinning ‘up’ and ‘down’ and orbiting around Ma. Through the movement of Mari, Amashigenryou is possible and it, itself, is revolving and condensing. Thus Amashigenryou creates the two aspects of Universe: Kamuna, The Latent World, and then Amana, the Phenomenal World. The Phenomenal World is created through the combined energies of Kamuna and Amana. Kamu is infinite energy of Universe.

Amashigenryou is the fundamental building block of Universe created by the motion of Mari. Mari are quanta of the ultimate differentiated “particles” and their movement creates all the quanta of Amashigenryou as well as the Latent World and the Physical World.

Kamuna and Amana Worlds

Worlds

Kamuna     Amana

Latent     Physical

Unseen     Seen

Infinite     Limited

Hidden     Present

Kamuna is the Latent World. We may call it the Unseen World, Infinite World, Hidden World. It is the world of pure nonphysical energy. Kamuna is mugen-sekai, Infinite world. 無限 mugen, limitless.

Amana is the world we know as the Physical World. Also it may be called the Seen World, Limited World, Present World, Phenomenal World. It is our familiar world of matter. Amana is gensho-sekai, Phenomenal World, the world we live in. 現象 gensho, phenomenal. 現 gen, present; sho, vision.

Note that author Fukano calls Kamuna and Amana “worlds.” Perhaps we can think of them as dimensions, or as Bohm’s orders. Amana comes from Kamuna. The Physical World comes from the Latent/Hidden World. The integrated chikara power of both creates Universe.

Kamuna Amana

Kamuna giving rise to Amana

Amashigenryou アマ 始 元 量

Amashigenryou is the elementary quantum of Universe, the spiraling of the microscopic particles of Universe. Everything is a converted version of Amashigenryou.  アマama; 始 shi, beginning; 元 gen, origin; 量 ryou, quantum

Amashigenryou always keeps revolving and rotating, repeating, overlapping, condensing, creating first Kamuna and then Amana. Then the chikara powers of Kamuna and Amana combine. The combined power creates  ryushi’, seen particles, which are the ‘gensho’ phenomenal particles, and stabilizes the Seen World. The Seen World then has matter, substance, seimei living things and objects.

Kamu and Mari

Kamu is infinite energy. There is infinite energy Kamu in Universe. Universe is made of physical matter as well as the Latent, i.e., the physical and the nonphysical. Amashigenryou is generated in the world of Infinite Kamu, from ‘the infinite derivation of Mari.’

Mari. The ultimate differentiated quantum of Universe is called Mari. It is the source of Amashigenryou and other quanta. Mari is a spherical particle. The size of Mari is in the order of 10^-80 cm. Mari is not a perfect sphere; it has a dent in its surface. Without this dent, rotation around an axis would not be possible. Mari simultaneously rotates clockwise and counter-clockwise, creating yin-yang polarities. 

Latent World

In the Latent World, Mari マリ are quanta of the itsu-tsumi (5 tsumi) : toki, tokoro, ikatsumi, makumi, karami.

toki is quantum of time

tokoro is quantum of place

ikatsumi is quantum of electricity

makumi is quantum of magnetism

karami is quantum of gravity

The mari of ‘toki’ is Amashigenryou, the quantum of time in the Latent World. The mari of ‘tokoro’ is  アメAme, the quantum of space in the Latent World. 

The last three tsumi (the quanta of electricity, magnetism, and gravity) are together called mitsugo in the Latent World. They create the living and non-living ‘mokoro’ with forces of electricity, magnetism, and gravity.

Mokoro in the Latent World consist of one each of the three mitsugo forces. The ‘object mokoro’ of nonliving things is a mitsugo with one axis that is repeatedly living and dying. The ‘seimei mokoro’ of living things has eight axes, instead of only one. All eight axes are living and dying repeatedly and all eight are rotating.

Physical World

The Physical World of Time, Space, and Everything is derived from, or created by, the Latent World through the action of the Mari.

Mari of ‘toki’ makes Time.

Mari of ‘tokoro’ makes Space.

The other Mari together make Everything: the living and nonliving things of the Physical  World.

Editor’s Note:  The details in this last part about the relationships between Latent and Physical Worlds come from the small table, very near the end, on page 225 of the book, while the beginning of this post comes from an earlier part of the book. We wish to express our appreciation to E.K. for assistance with the difficult translation. 

Concluding Remarks

The physics of Fukano is not easy to understand, and we do not claim to have interpreted it correctly. However, we feel it is important to call it to your attention so that you can delve more deeply into its study. We continue with Parts 2 and 3.

Revised 2017.04.12

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Toyouke Ōkami

 

dscn2973

Toyoke-sama.  Our beloved Toyoke-sama is also known as Toyoke Kami and Toyouke Ōkami 豊受大神. Toyoke-sama was arguably the greatest kami of Hotsuma. He is remembered as the father of Isanami and grandfather of Amateru. Amateru came to study with him when he was sixteen. Toyoke-sama imparted to the future Amakami of Yamato the wisdom of the ancestors known as the To-no-Wosite teachings of the Ame-naru Michi, the Way of Universe. 

The teaching is for all, and especially for leaders of society, to embody high principles of human behavior: honesty, integrity, and caring for the welfare of others.

Hutakami.  Toyoke’s daughter Hisako became Isanami, spouse of Isanagi. The couple are known as Hutakami (Futakami), the kami couple of myth and legend. The Hutakami went throughout the land of Hinomoto teaching the Awa no Uta, the Song of Universe, containing all 48 of the syllables of Wosite language, promoting speech for improved communication and cooperation as well as for promoting good health and vitality.

Takamimusubi.  Toyoke was descended from Ta-no-Kunisatsuchi. Toyoke’s imina birth name was Tamakine. This means he was a man of tama spirit. We notice the many local words beginning with Ta. Tamakine became the fifth Takamimusubi in Hitakami which we now call Tohoku. Hi-taka-mi means to see the sun high in the sky. A remnant of Hitakami remains in the name of the major Tohoku river, Kitakami-gawa, whose old name was indeed Hitakami-gawa.

Taga.  The center of Hitakami was at Tagajo (Taka-jo), east of current Sendai. You can get there after a short train ride. You will be shown the remains of a former government center. There is still a large stone inscribed in more recent times, called the Keta-tsubo. On this rise may have been located the Yamate-miya of Toyoke. Nearby are several shrines named Taga Jinja. One of these, we believe, is the original shrine of Toyoke. This shrine spun off the Taga Taisha in Ōmi (now Shiga-ken). Why Ōmi? Ōmi was the center of Yamato under the care of Isanami and Isanagi.

We visited Taga Taisha. It is a large shrine that hosts a million devotees on New Year’s Hatsumode. By looking for the oldest part of the keidai precincts, we found Toyoke’s hokora next to Amateru’s.

Tanba.  Toyoke lived to a ripe age. When he was quite along in years, there was a disturbance in the region we call Kyotango in Kyoto-fu near the Japan Sea. Amateru asked Toyoke-sama to manage the situation from a base in Miyazu. Toyoke-sama transferred from Hitakami to Tanba and all went well and the people prospered. Toyoke-sama taught how to raise the five grains such as rice, wheat, and beans, and also how to raise silkworms for weaving.

When Toyoke-sama felt his lifeforce dwindling, he called for a tomb to be dug in the mountain of Kujigatake. He would prepare for his last breath. When Amateru heard about his grandfather, he rushed to his side. He entered Toyoke’s tomb and received the final teaching. Thus Amateru was initiated into the high level of wisdom. Then Amateru was sent out and the tomb sealed. The people were in such grief that Amateru stayed for a while to comfort them.

Toyoke’s tomb is said to be on Mt. Kujigatake (Kushi-gatake, also called Manai-gatake) where there is a manai spring. At the foot of Kujigatake is a shrine called Hinumanai Jinja. Toyoke Ōkami is the revered deity. The monument shown above mentions Five Grains. It is said that half-way up the mountain is an altar rock for the offering of five grains and other foods.

When Amateru himself came to the end of his life, he had a tomb built nearby. Amateru’s trusted friend, Sarutahiko, was the last to see Amateru in his tomb.

Futomani.  Toyoke-sama is the author of the Futomani Motoake chart which was employed as an aid for teaching cosmology and as a guide for decision-making. Amateru complemented the Futomani by selecting its 128 waka. We wouldn’t be surprised if Toyoke-sama also organized the Wosite syllabary into the neat, logical system that it is.

awa_motoake

Motoake chart from Julian-Way

Another grandson of Toyoke-sama also attended the lessons with Amateru, and he became Takagi, the seventh Takamimusubi.

ukesuteme     ne no kuni ni kite     tamakine ni …

Ukesuteme came to Ne no kuni to see Tamakine …   from Hotsuma Tsutae Aya 15

Another Kunisatsuchi, Ta’s brother, Ka-no-Kunisatsuchi, had gone to China, and he had a descendant named Ukesuteme. Ukesuteme came to Hitakami to study with Toyoke accompanied by the sister of Isanagi from the land of Ne. Shirayama-hime (Kokori-hime) and Ukesuteme both excelled in acquiring the wisdom of To.

ukesuteme korohin kimi to      tinami ai

After Ukesuteme returned to the Korohin mountains and married the ruler of Akagata, they had a son. Consequently, admired for her wisdom as for her nurturing, she became known as Nishi no Haha, Mother of the West. In China, the Mother of the West has the name Xi Wangu. She is one of the Seven Immortals. In Taoist paintings she holds the Peach of Immortality in her hand. In the Wosite literature, it is written that she received peach branches from Toyoke-sama to plant in Korohin.

Alternate identities.  Another name for the kami of food is Ukanomitama. And Toyouke’s most popular identity is Inari, the kami of the rice fields. The Inari shrines are the most plentiful in Japan, grounded in folk religion. Inari devotees may not realize the connection with the sage of Hitakami.

Toyouke at Ise and Moto-Ise Shrines:  Probably due to Toyouke’s reknown as provider of Five Grains and foodstuffs, his name has morphed into the female Toyouke-hime no kami at the Geku Outer Shrine of Ise Jingu. And yet, the chigi of the honden is cut vertically in male sotosogi fashion! As it is at the Moto-Ise shrines Hinumanai Jinja and Manai Jinja Okumiya of Kono Jinja (below).

dscn3042

Remembering Toyoke-sama

Let us remember Toyoke-sama who served the people of Hinomoto during their critical developmental period. Toyoke-sama, the great sage, set society’s tone of compassion based on a deep connection with Universe  And in remembering Tamakine Toyoke-sama, we do not forget our own tama nature.

Note:  This has been cross-posted from  https://woshiteworld.wordpress.com/2017/03/05/toyouke-okami/

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