Kimi no Na Wa and Twilight

twilight_earth-e1469041145347

Kataware-doki Fragment of Time

We are told in the movie, Kimi no Na Wa, that kataware-doki means twilight in the dialect of Hida, where Mitsuha lives. Iwakage has more about the land of Hida as seen in the movie, if you click here. 

Strange things can happen during kataware-doki, the toki time of kataware. And they do, in the movie.

Kataware means a fragment. Fragment of time. Also, the fragment of the meteor that crashes to earth in Hida, obliterating Mitsuha’s hometown.

Let’s consider the fragment of time called kataware-doki. Twilight is a fascinating time of day — or is it night? It is the time between day and night, when it is neither day nor is it night. It is kure, dusk. Many haiku have been written about kure. Here’s one by Basho.

kono michi ya / yuku hito nashi ni / aki no kure.

This path —  no one walks it  —  autumn twilight

This lonely path that Basho describes could be a viewed as an autumn day turning into night, or as late autumn when the season turns to winter. It may even allude to the time when his life is coming to a close.

Kure is a border between two things such as light and dark, life and death, between two instants of time. It is at such a border that all things are possible.

As we were pondering twilight, Earth and Sky posted an article on three definitions of twilight, saying “You can define twilight simply as the time of day between daylight and darkness, whether that’s after sunset, or before sunrise.” They explain how Civil, Nautical, and Astronomical Twilight are defined — astronomically.

Still, these definitions do not explain how we feel about twilight.

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Photo: Earth at twilight as viewed from space, NASA

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Kimi no Na Wa and Musubi

kumihimo musubi S

Preface

Kimi no Na Wa is an extremely popular and powerful anime movie directed by Makoto Shinkai. We say “powerful” in that it is thought-provoking of matters outside the ordinary limits of time and space.

Musubi.  Kumihimo is a Japanese braiding method for making decorative and functional cords, and it is depicted in several scenes in the movie. Musubi is a knot, a tying together, of connecting people and things. The photo shows two kumihimo cords in a musubi knot.

Motohisa Yamakage has taught Koshinto through books such as The Essence of Shinto. Yamakage Sensei writes, “Musubi means to unite or bind together. … the concept of musubi signifies the proliferation of life and spirit. … the very process of creating and giving birth to life and spirit is described as musubi and we [Koshinto] place it in very high regard.”

Time and Space.  We have related the Tanabata Festival tale as the weaving of time and space. This is an observance since early Jomon times that takes place in the seventh night of the seventh lunar month, when the moon is only half-full and the stars in the Milky Way can clearly be seen. The word tanabata means a kind of weaving loom. So picture a fabric being woven with threads of warp and woof. The threads of the warp represent the flow of time, and the shuttling of the woof creates space.

Kimi no Na wa (君の名は) is an international hit movie, entitled Your Name in English. The warping and entangling of time and space is the theme of this metaphysical movie. Perhaps that’s why millions of people find the movie so intriguing.

In today’s essay, we consider how the movie conveys the message of Musubi through the imagery of braiding.

Early on in the movie, we see that Mitsuha lives with her sister and grandmother in a very small town in the rural land of Hida. Grandmother is priestess of an old shrine which has as its goshintai sacred object a megalith in the center of a meteor crater. Mitsuha serves as miko-san shrine maiden and performs a ritual at the shrine. Grandmother is also teaching Mitsuha to braid cords in the style of kumihimo. What, we wonder, is the significance of these elements?

Musubi in Kimi no Na wa

Grandmother’s explanation of Musubi uses the imagery of kumihimo. In one scene, Mitsuha and her sister are going with their grandmother on a pilgrimage to the sacred place of the megalith. On the way, Grandmother is explaining Musubi. We have restored the original word, kami, to the subtitles.

Musubi is the old way of calling the local guardian kami.

Tying thread is Musubi. Connecting people is Musubi.

These are all the kami’s power.

So the braided cords that we make are the kami’s art and represent the flow of time itself.

They converge and take shape. They twist, tangle, sometimes unravel, break, then connect again.

Musubi-knotting. That’s time.

Musubi

From the above, we can see that the concept of musubi is that of gathering and connecting. Grandmother has explained how people are connected in time and space, and she stresses the time element. This is the basic theme of the movie.

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Tanabata Matsuri — A Star Festival of Ancient Hinomoto

800px-Tanabata_Festival_in_Edo_(Hiroshige,_1852)In this post, we discuss the popular Tanabata Festival in terms of its origin.  This star festival of the Weaver was traditionally held on the seventh night of the seventh lunar month. It is held in July or August in modern times.

While many think erroneously that the Tanabata Festival is of Continental origin, this post by Julian Way shows that it was known in Hinomoto long before Continental contact:

     “Tanahata is a festival already ancient in Hotsuma times.”

Tanahata is a loom for ori weaving.  Tanahata matsuri is indigenous to the early people of Japan and is described in the Wosite documents Mikasafumi and Hotsuma Tsutae. This passage is from the Mikasafumi document.

From Namekoto no Aya in Mikasafumi,  as presented in Julian-Way:

afumi matsu     /     fume ni yawashite

kaze to nasu     /     yumi hari ni umu

iu to asa     /     woto tanahata no

hoshi matsuri     /     mochi ha miwoya to

iki tama ni     /     yena no hasuke no

me-wo a-e ha     /     a-ogi odori te

i o ukuru

Mikasafumi Namekoto no aya

Afumi  is the 7th month of the luni-solar calendar of the old days. Fume ni yawashite, the heat of summer is softening.

Yumi-hari is the first quarter of the moon, the seventh day, so the night sky is dark and stars can be seen. At the end of the seven days, a ceremony is held. Cotton and asa (hemp) are spun in the ceremony called woto tanahata no hoshi matsuri.  [Hoshi matsuri, star festival, where hoshi means star and matsuri is translated festival, although it meant an observance in the olden days.]  This is the star festival of Tanahata.

From time immemorial, weaving was sacred work that has been entrusted to women. The ceremony of tanahata, too, was considered sacred.

The special Wosite letter  wo  seen in the third line of the verse has a vertical line indicating the unseen connection to the stars. Stars are honored as ancestors. The other  wo  in  me-wo  refers to male and  me  to female.

Amemiwoya and Universe

The origin of Universe can be understood through Amemiwoya as the Great Origin. Amemiwoya is the Cosmic Parent. Amemiwoya is like the pole star, and Kunitokotachi and the eight Kunisatsuchi sons are like the stars rotating around the pole star.

つまり機織りはアメノノリ(アメの法則)を目に見える形にするという、尊いお仕事なのですね。

In short, weaving is precious work that makes Ame-no-nori the Law of the Cosmos visible in form. So, both the order of the world and governing were taught by likening to hataori weaving with a loom.

Tanahata is a festival already ancient in Hotsuma times.

Odori, dance

なんと、(祖先を)仰ぎ、 踊って アメ のエネルギーを受ける・・・元気になる。

Our ancestors looked up, danced, and received the energy of Universe and  –good health.

縄文のころからの私達の伝統であったのです。

It was our tradition from Jomon times.

Long ago, when thinking of the beginning of the world and the beginning of people while looking up at the beautiful stars in the night sky, our hearts communed with our precious ancestors and started this ceremony dedicated to stars.

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Image: Woodblock print, Tanabata Matsuri in Edo by Hiroshige

Photo: Sky and Telescope

milky-way-great-rift_480x2741

 

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Lahaina Noon, 2017

The Bishop Museum of Honolulu has published the dates of Lahaina Noon for 2017. Lahaina Noon is the popular name for kau ka lā i ka lolo, when the sun is directly overhead. The two dates for selected cities are as follows.

Līhue:   May 31 12:35 p.m.July 12 12:42 p.m.

Kāne‘ohe:   May 27 12:28 p.m.July 15 12:37 p.m.

Honolulu:   May 26 12:28 p.m.July 16 12:37 p.m.

Kaunakakai:   May 25 12:25 p.m.July 16 12:34 p.m.

Lāna‘i City:   May 23 12:24 p.m.July 18 12:34 p.m.

Lahaina:   May 24 12:23 p.m.July 18 12:33 p.m.

Kahului:   May 2412:22 p.m.July 18 12:32 p.m.

Hana:   May 23 12:20 p.m.July 18 12:30 p.m.

Hilo:   May 18 12:16 p.m.July 24 12:27 p.m.

Kailua-Kona:   May 18 12:20 p.m.July 24 12:30 p.m.

South Point Island of Hawai‘i:   May 14 12:19 p.m.July 27 12:28 p.m.

 

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Magnetic Field of our Milky Way Galaxy and the Magellanic Bridge

Milky Way galaxy’s magnetic field. Image by Planck satellite 2014 via ESA/ Planck/ APOD.

From EarthSky.Org:

Scientists have found a magnetic bridge between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. They’re calling it the Magellanic Bridge.

This eye-catching image depicts the magnetic field of our own Milky Way galaxy. We don’t often think about our galaxy’s magnetic field, do we? Or a magnetic bridge between galaxies? Well, EarthSky has posted a story about the newly-dubbed Magellanic Bridge, a magnetic bridge between two galaxies. These are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, satellites to our galaxy. No, the image above is not the bridge, which cannot be imaged at this time.

Jane Kaczmarek is a doctoral student at the University of Sydney, and she’s lead author of the paper in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. EarthSky quotes her:

‘The observation of the magnetic field, which is one millionth the strength of the Earth’s, may provide insight into whether it was generated from within the Bridge after the structure formed, or was ‘ripped’ from the dwarf galaxies when they interacted and formed the structure.’

‘In general, we don’t know how such vast magnetic fields are generated, nor how these large-scale magnetic fields affect galaxy formation and evolution … Understanding the role that magnetic fields play in the evolution of galaxies and their environment is a fundamental question in astronomy that remains to be answered.’

For the full story, please follow the link to EarthSky.

http://earthsky.org/space/a-giant-magnetic-bridge-between-galaxies

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The Super-Science of Katakamuna, by K. Fukano – 3.

 

Two WorldsLatent and Phenomenal Worlds

by K. Fukano

For reference, we present the complete syllabary chart of Katakamuna. This chart is from K. Fukano’s book. Fukano has placed the Katakamuna symbols in modern syllable order, for the sake of the modern reader. It was probably not done this way in Katakamuna days. Note that in the “u” row, the leftmost entry is “n” where “wu” should be. That is the way it is done in modern times. However, there is reason to believe that it was originally “wu.”

Katakamuna Syllabary

by K. Fukano

Katakamuna AIUEO

Fukano uses this chart to demonstrate the similarities of Katakamuna and katakana syllables. He suggests that Katakamuna is the root of katakana. He points out characters ki, sa, to, yi, ra, and ri. What do you see?

For comparison with Wosite, here is the Wosite syllabary of 48 characters. Note that Wosite consonant order varies from the order shown above. Consonant order is important because it is an indication of the process of development during that time period. The biggest difference is that there is no “n” in Wosite. Instead, in the proper place there is indeed “wu.”

Wosite Syllabary

by Y. Matsumoto

Wosite 48.001

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The Super-Science of Katakamuna, by K. Fukano – 2.

KATAKAMUNA 3 centers

We continue reporting on the book by physicist K. Fukano. He has studied the 80 verses of the Katakamuna scrolls as presented by Narasaki, and has interpreted them according to his own knowledge of physics. Katakamuna verses are written in the style of waka, i.e., in rhythm of five and seven, five and seven, etc. They are written in spiral fashion beginning in the middle. In the center is a circular symbol, one of the three shown here. The most coKATAKAMUNA verses 5 & 6mmon circle is the Yatanokakami symbol, the one on top which occurs in 71 out of 80 verses. The next is called Futomani which appears in 7, and the bottom circle is the Mikumari, in 2 verses.

These two spirals are Verses 5 and 6 of the Katakamuna scrolls. Together they are the most important. Verse 5 has 24 characters. Verse 6 has 24+5 characters, the last five being “Ka ta ka mu na,” which may be taken to be the title of this work, and will be omitted from the analysis.

Together, these two verses have 48 syllables/characters. All of the Katakamuna characters appear once and only once in these two verses. The spiraling characters have been put into the form of a table, as shown at bottom. This chart comes from Narasaki’s “orange booklet,” Ultra-Ancient Civilization of Japan, which we reported on earlier. By studying the chart, we can figure out how the character syllabary was organized and formed.

Before going on, we’d like to give this excerpt from the earlier post. We wrote:

Narasaki learned from the scrolls that spinning and orbiting are the basic nature of time and space. Because of the spinning and orbiting motions, there is a center of motion and the  energy is equal in all directions. This wave movement makes magnetic and electrical energy. This affects mountains, the environment, humans, and plants.

Character Order of Katakamuna

The organization of the Katakamuna syllabary of characters is not by a, i, u, e, o, although those are indeed the five vowels. Let us read Verse 5:

hi hu mi yo i     ma wa ri te me ku ru

mu na ya ko to     a u no su he si re

Verse 5

Verse 5

Now, look at the two sequences of five characters:  hi fu mi yo i      mu na ya ko to. These are the numbers from one to ten!

HI FU MI.002

Next, examine the small circle going around the larger circle. Starting from the “east” position, the circle moves counter-clockwise from hi (1) through ya (8), and there is a double small circle for ko (9), and finally no circle at all for to (10). Already, we see that the character sequence describes movement in space and time. It may represent the sun’s cycle as seen from earth, from sunrise to the next sunrise. We have learned in Part 1 that the small circle is called Mari and the large circle is Ma.

You can study Verse 6 in the same way.

ka ta ti sa ki     so ra ni mo ro ke se

yu ye nu o wo     ha e tu yi ne ho n*

Note: possibly “n” was originally pronounced “wu.” See Part 3.

Verse 6

Verse 6

The characters may be grouped according to their similarities. The seven characters, ma wa ri te me ku ru,  do seem to be related, don’t they? And so for the second set of seven, a u no su he si re. We can group the characters in this fashion all the way to the end.

Yatanokakami

Yatanokakami and 48 characters

48 in Yatanokakami

The chart above has grouped the 48 characters into similar patterns. The illustration makes a point: all 48 symbols come from the Yatanokakami symbol. The circular symbol with eight small circles in the center of Verses 5 and 6 and the vast majority of the verses is called Yatanokakami. What is it, and what does it mean? Let us break this long word down into its constituent parts. Ka can mean root, and it can stand for chikara, power. Mi is essence (e.g., fruit). Therefore, kami is the essence of the root or essence of the power.

What is kakami? We usually think that a kagami is a mirror. In this case, using the two meanings of ka, we have: the essence of the root of the power.

What is yatanoYa is eight in traditional Japanese. Yatano means fully saturated. It is equivalent to eight electrons fully saturating the orbit around the nucleus of an atom.

Finally, Yatanokakami means the fully saturated essence of the root of the power. That is represented by the symbol of the Ma circle and its eight Mari circles. In other words, it is the cosmology of Ama, Universe. And Katakamuna is the root of Universe.

Table of Verses 5 and 6

Verses 5-6

Comments

In the above poems, we have used original syllable pronunciations, not the more recent Chinese sounds. The four Sino-Japanese sounds are chi (originally ti), tsu (tu), shi (si) and fu (hu).

You may have noted a lack of dakuon voiced consonants. Ancient languages followed the Kototama principle and avoided dakuon because it darkens vocal energy. Examples of voiced (unvoiced) syllables: da (ta),  zu (su), bi (hi). See also other posts with keyword “Kototama” by Okunomichi and by WoshiteWorld.wordpress.com.

Revised 2017.04.14

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